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Rebecca Guay’s Dreamlike Paintings Explore Sensuality

Rebecca Guay is an artist whose dreamlike watercolor paintings invite viewers to languish in their sensual imagery. Ornamented with gold leaf, her female protagonists luxuriate on lofty clouds and in cool lagoons. The characters look like goddesses unfettered by mortal woes, at ease in their nudity. Guay's style of rendering figures with elongated faces and limbs evokes the Pre-Raphaelite movement of the 19th century, though her flat style gives her work a more contemporary look reminiscent of Japanese illustration. Take a look at some of her latest works below.

Rebecca Guay is an artist whose dreamlike watercolor paintings invite viewers to languish in their sensual imagery. Ornamented with gold leaf, her female protagonists luxuriate on lofty clouds and in cool lagoons. The characters look like goddesses unfettered by mortal woes, at ease in their nudity. Guay’s style of rendering figures with elongated faces and limbs evokes the Pre-Raphaelite movement of the 19th century, though her flat style gives her work a more contemporary look reminiscent of Japanese illustration. Take a look at some of her latest works below.

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