Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

On View: “Safe From Tomorrow” by Kathie Olivas at AFA Gallery

"Their world was soft like melancholy. The conversation was silent. Their faces were small and round, incapable of invoking fear. Once the door was open, nothing could be unseen." This is how Kathie Olivas describes the childlike subjects of her latest exhibition at AFA gallery, "Safe from Tomorrow". The show boasts a series of 20 new paintings and 16 sculptures inspired by early Americana portraiture. The nostalgia felt by her palette and inspiration is constrasted with a concept set in the future.


“Safe from Tomorrow” by Kathie Olivas

“Their world was soft like melancholy. The conversation was silent. Their faces were small and round, incapable of invoking fear. Once the door was open, nothing could be unseen.” This is how Kathie Olivas describes the childlike subjects of her latest exhibition at AFA gallery, “Safe from Tomorrow”. The show boasts a series of 20 new paintings and 16 sculptures inspired by early Americana portraiture. The nostalgia felt by her palette and inspiration is constrasted with a concept set in the future. Olivas’ earlier works tell a more apolcalyptic story, as melancholy little girls looked on in fear. Here, their eyes are filled with curiousity and newfound strength. Donned in armor borrowed from their animal friends, their “protectors of tomorrow”, they are safe from what is to come.

“Safe from Tomorrow” by Kathie Olivas exhibits at AFA Gallery through January 31st, 2015.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
New Zealand based artist Peter Stichbury combines attractive good looks with ugliness in 1950s style portraits. His Big-Eyed young subjects represent non-conventional beauty, something we can find in today's supermodels and misfits alike. Stichbury regards these young people as a collective group in society, which he renders in a style that flattens their facial features to a non specific point. In their abstract, clone-like similarities, they become anonymous and linked to one another. They are intentionally deprived of human emotion, owing to their awkwardness. At the same time, his aesthetic can be regarded as strangely realistic.
One could say that Surrealism as a movement is a way for artists to seek distraction from the mundane and engage in fantasy. On his current exhibition at AFA Gallery, painter Daniel Merriam shares, “Although I may be guilty of a little denial, it’s enabled me to go to the edge and back, which is kind of where people expect an artist to go." Spanning over 20 new watercolor paintings, titled "Now You See Me: The Art of Escapism", he allows himself to overcome the limitations of reality in this latest series.
Los Angeles based artist Justin Bower’s larger than life oil paintings feature anonymous subjects that appear digitized, but are painstakingly hand-painted. Through their expressive, glitchy faces, first covered in Hi-Fructose Vol 31, Bower examines our close relationship with technology. In our 2014 interview with the artist, he said, "My work is foremost about the destabilization of the contemporary subject in an increasing control society, and often I use the digital realm as the environment to place them in. It’s almost an ontological build up from scratch, building a new idea of who we are." On September 10th, Bower will debut a long-awaited new series at UNIX Gallery in New York with his exhibit "The Humiliations".
On Saturday night, Thinkspace celebrated Jacub Gagnon’s second solo exhibition at the gallery with “Worlds Collide” (previewed here). “My paintings become a space in which nature becomes unnatural, bordering surreal,” Gagnon shares. By leaving the surroundings of his royal animal subjects to the viewer’s imagination, the focus of his work becomes connectivity. In other words, Gagnon is inspired by the connection between human and animal relationships and mixes the two here. Gagnon begins his acrylic paintings with a black background, building the light and detail backwards until the final image is revealed. Details such as foxes wearing vintage teacups and bearded owls decorated with monarch butterflies are especially ornate.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List