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Preview: “Praeteritum Nunc Futurum” at Merry Karnowsky Gallery

Praeteritum Nunc Futurum. Translation: Past, present, and future. Tomorrow night, Merry Karnowsky gallery closes out the year with past and new works from their roster, serving as a preview of 2015. References to time can also be found, as in the Victorian subjects in Lezley Saar's piece, or Nicola Verlato's sweeping scene starring Kimbra in an old Western gone wrong. Preview after the jump!


Nicola Verlato

Praeteritum Nunc Futurum. Translation: Past, present, and future. Tomorrow night, Merry Karnowsky gallery closes out the year with past and new works from their roster, serving as a preview of 2015. References to time can also be found, as in the Victorian subjects in Lezley Saar’s piece, or Nicola Verlato’s sweeping scene starring Kimbra in an old Western gone wrong. Artists such as Jeff Soto and Greg ‘Craola’ Simkins offer more humorous, character based paintings. Craola’s The Gobbler portrays a knight riding a turkey through a strange combination of holiday symbols. Mark Whalen also inserts humor into his illustrations, which read like a reimagining of ancient people’s life, from arm-wrestling to preparing sacrifices. Take a look at our preview of the show below.


Mark Whalen


Mark Whalen (detail)


Travis Louie


Jeff Soto


Greg ‘Craola’ Simkins


Nicola Verlato (detail)

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