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Myriam Mechita’s Surreal Sculptures Entrance with Intense Visuals

Interdisciplinary artist Myriam Mechita creates sculptures, installations, and drawings where graphically violent content is presented as ornamental, sparkling eye candy, resulting in climactic visuals that stir the senses. Mechita's sculpture work mixes ceramics and found objects and often features beheaded animals — especially deer — hanging upside down in methodical arrangements. Plastic beads — like those that hang from beaded curtains or Mardi Gras necklaces — appear to spill out of their necks. The animals' bodies become almost like ritualistic sacrifices in Mechita's work, which carefully balances darkly surrealist juxtapositions, occult imagery, and decorative kitsch.

Interdisciplinary artist Myriam Mechita creates sculptures, installations, and drawings where graphically violent content is presented as ornamental, sparkling eye candy, resulting in climactic visuals that stir the senses. Mechita’s sculpture work mixes ceramics and found objects and often features beheaded animals — especially deer — hanging upside down in methodical arrangements. Plastic beads — like those that hang from beaded curtains or Mardi Gras necklaces — appear to spill out of their necks. The animals’ bodies become almost like ritualistic sacrifices in Mechita’s work, which carefully balances darkly surrealist juxtapositions, occult imagery, and decorative kitsch.

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