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Preview: “Wait for the Moon” at Arch Enemy Arts

Opening this Friday, December 12, at Arch Enemy Arts in Philadelphia, "Wait for the Moon" is a group show based on folklore and legend. Each of the artists — such as Kukula, David Seidman, Jeremy Hush, Naoto Hattori, Ranson & Mitchell and others — was assigned a Brothers Grimm fairytale to reinterpret in their work. Many of the artists chosen for the show already work with folkloric, occult imagery and the exhibition successfully captures the dark undertones of the original Grimm stories before they were watered down for mass consumption.


David Seidman

Opening this Friday, December 12, at Arch Enemy Arts in Philadelphia, “Wait for the Moon” is a group show based on folklore and legend. Each of the artists — such as Kukula, David Seidman, Jeremy Hush, Naoto Hattori, Ranson & Mitchell and others — was assigned a Brothers Grimm fairytale to reinterpret in their work. Many of the artists chosen for the show already work with folkloric, occult imagery and the exhibition successfully captures the dark undertones of the original Grimm stories before they were watered down for mass consumption.


Ransom&Mitchell


Naoto Hattori


Jeremy Hush


Jel Ena


Carly Janine Mazur


Sean A. Murray


Paul Romano

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