Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Madiha Siraj Creates Immersive Installations Using Commonplace Objects

Madiha Siraj creates intensely colorful installations that overstimulate the senses. Through the accumulation of cheap, commonplace materials, her works become veritable visual spectacles. "Oyster EB-124," for instance, invited viewers to enter a room lined floor-to-ceiling with rainbow paint swatches that form pixelated-looking patterns. The patterns become disrupted at certain points in the room where the paint swatches' shapes lose their regularity.

Madiha Siraj creates intensely colorful installations that overstimulate the senses. Through the accumulation of cheap, commonplace materials, her works become veritable visual spectacles. “Oyster EB-124,” for instance, invited viewers to enter a room lined floor-to-ceiling with rainbow paint swatches that form pixelated-looking patterns. The patterns become disrupted at certain points in the room where the paint swatches’ shapes lose their regularity.

In another previous work, “5x5x5,” Siraj laid out dozens of miniature, five-by-five-inch clay sculptures, which viewers were allowed to purchase for $5 and take home, subsequently altering the work with each transaction. She seems to be interested in cultivating environments that give viewers hands-on experiences.

“Currently I am working on a series of works that revolve around a concept of patterns that are preordained and can exist and be built upon beyond the artist’s lifetime,” she wrote in an email to Hi-Fructose. “Yet, the work is crafted very meticulously which is representative of the hand of the artist. Therefore the work is both an outcome of personal aesthetics and a preordained structure.”

“Oyster EB-124,” 2011:

“Oyster EB-12,” 2011:

“5x5x5”:

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Sculptor Katie Grinnan first unveiled the sculpture “Mirage” in 2011, offering an exploration of movement and space. Constructed from friendly plastic, sand, and enamel, the piece first debuted as part of an exhibition at Brennan & Griffin. The piece is actually a cast of Grinnan’s own body, set in various poses during a yoga routine. The work also calls back to Hindu art, in which gods display several limbs and omnipresence.
Adam Parker Smith, a sculptor and installation artist based in New York, creates works that offer different insights at every perspective. His sculptures, made from resin, fiberglass, steel, and preserved mylar, emulate party balloons, recalling the work of artists like Jeff Koons. Yet Smith exposes the hollow innards of his work at different angles, and calls upon inspiration from centuries past.
James Moore’s futuristic installations blend elements of sci-fi, light experimentation, and post-apocalyptic visions. He uses massive cybernetic characters and gridwork to toy with perspectives in the room his work inhabits. And in recent work, blends 3D sculpture with those illusionary tactics.
In a major installation at Tolarno Galleries in Melbourne, Christopher Langton built his own immersive system of celestial bodies, robots, and organisms resembling viruses and fungi. “The hyperreal manifestation of Langton’s own recent experiences beset by life-threatening disease and infection, ‘Colony’ beckons us to consider that we are all multi-cellular symbiotic organisms, negotiating a precarious shared ecology,” the gallery says.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List