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The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Macabre and Decorative New Works by Magnus Gjoen

British digital artist Magnus Gjoen has an unmistakeable style that decorates macabre subjects, previously featured here. It's jarring but also awe inspiring work that makes you look twice; images of the crucifixion, political figures, and flowery skulls that recall his hey-day at Vivienne Westwood. In recent months, Gjoen has addressed our definition of beauty using opposing symbols of war and high society.

British digital artist Magnus Gjoen has an unmistakeable style that decorates macabre subjects, previously featured here. It’s jarring but also awe inspiring work that makes you look twice; images of the crucifixion, political figures, and flowery skulls that recall his hey-day at Vivienne Westwood. In recent months, Gjoen has addressed our definition of beauty using opposing symbols of war and high society. Threatening objects with the power to kill like tanks and machine guns are treated with a classical beauty. Stylistically speaking, he is taking inspiration from contemporary artists like Charles Krafft juxtaposed with the techniques of fine art. Although very different, Gjoen successfully brings together ideas of nihilism and spirituality, life and death. We take a look at his latest images below.

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Closing today at Leontia Gallery in London, "FLESH" exhibits sensual, raw and dark new works by Magnus Gjoen, Flora Borsi, Maria Koshneneko, Mariska Karto. Their pieces examine the beautiful and fragile, haunting and disturbing aspects of the figure, reinterpreted in a variety of media. Each sheds new light on this classical idea, by embracing it with contemporary and pop styles mixed with the influences of fine art.
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