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Opening Night: “Return of the Hot Pot Girls” by Katsuya Terada at GR2

GR2 recently celebrated the return of Japanese comics artist Katsuya Terada's 'Hot Pot Girls'. Aptly titled "Return of the Hot Pot Girls" (previewed here) his exhibition is an original series of girls wearing Japanese cooking pots, drawn in striking detail. At a live drawing event on Sunday, Terada shared his undeniable connection to French artist Moebius- "It's impossible to keep away from what you like and enjoy."

GR2 recently celebrated the return of Japanese comics artist Katsuya Terada’s ‘Hot Pot Girls’. Aptly titled “Return of the Hot Pot Girls” (previewed here) his exhibition is an original series of girls wearing Japanese cooking pots, drawn in striking detail. At a live drawing event on Sunday, Terada shared his undeniable connection to French artist Moebius– “It’s impossible to keep away from what you like and enjoy.”


Mari Inukai (left) with Katsuya Terada (right) on opening night.

Of the 42 pieces on display, his most lively are of imaginary monsters and exaggerated predators. Each is a counterpart to a miniature Hot Pot Girl, tiny in a web of swirling pencil lines. Although Terada’s excution looks complex, it is the result of organic, fluid thinking. On his process, he said, “I draw a single line, and that determines the composition; each new line turns into another new line, and so on, until the piece is completed… but drawing is still really difficult [laughs].” Despite this being his 30th year as a professional, there is still joy to be found in the challenge of his creations. 

“Return of the Hot Pot Girls” by Katsuya Terada is now on view at GR2 through December 3rd.

All photos courtesy Giant Robot/GR2.

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