Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Chris Labrooy’s Fantasy Vehicles in “Tales of Auto Elasticity”

UK graphic designer and artist Chris Labrooy riffs on custom car culture in his latest digital illustration series, "Tales of Auto Elasticity." A follow-up to last year's "Auto Aerobics," in which Labrooy placed his bendy, sculptural low riders in a city park, "Tales of Auto Elasticity" shows pick-up trucks with yogic flexibility bending to extreme degrees in a rural parking lot. Though Labrooy's work exists only on the computer screen, it evokes sculptures like Erwin Wurm's pudgy sports cars (featured in HF Vol. 22) and Ichwan Noor's Beetle sphere (covered here). Perhaps Labrooy should consider sculpture as his next step.

UK graphic designer and artist Chris Labrooy riffs on custom car culture in his latest digital illustration series, “Tales of Auto Elasticity.” A follow-up to last year’s “Auto Aerobics,” in which Labrooy placed his bendy, sculptural low riders in a city park, “Tales of Auto Elasticity” shows pick-up trucks with yogic flexibility bending to extreme degrees in a rural parking lot. Though Labrooy’s work exists only on the computer screen, it evokes sculptures like Erwin Wurm’s pudgy sports cars (featured in HF Vol. 22) and Ichwan Noor’s Beetle sphere (covered here). Perhaps Labrooy should consider sculpture as his next step.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
"Void Season" is a different kind of fashion project that makes us excited to see how the future of fashion is going to look. What first appears as an eccentric, simulated dance and a color-coordinated Tumblr exploration turns out to be a study of algorithmic textiles and procedural surfaces. This digital magic was created by the Berlin, Germany based design studio known as Zeitguised. Their mesmerizing visuals are crafted as a unique blend of tantalizing design, handmade algorithms and bespoke generative processes.
Russian artist Uno Moralez crafts images that are a throwback to seemingly less sophisticated, earlier days of digital art. Yet, what the artist has done is forge a novel, fascinating way to communicate narrative. They’re not quite comics, yet Moralez often depends on more than one image to share his stories, which move between pulp, campy horror, sci-fi, or something stranger and dream-like.
French illustrator and designer Nicolas Obery works with deep contrasts and haunting imagery for his monochromatic digital art series, "Fantasmagorik." The finely textured, elaborate pieces are sometimes pure imagination and sometimes incorporate photography, but Obery leaves nothing untouched by his digital brush. Even the photographic parts of his work are manipulated and stylized in such a way that they bear great similarity to the expressionistic possibilities of painting. Influenced by the H.R. Geiger, Obery weaves the elements of his work together with a sinewy, tissue-like texture that evokes the biomorphic qualities of the late Swiss artist's work.
William Basso's current show at New York's Last Rites Gallery, "Mise-en-scene," takes its name from a French theater term that describes all the elements in a stage production or film — the actors, lighting, scenery, etc. Basso treats his mixed-media assemblages something like tiny film sets. He begins by sculpting his figures out of a hodgepodge of materials, such as clay, cardboard, string, paper, wire, tape, wood, hair, and odd bits of cloth. Then, he photographs these sculptures, alters them in PhotoShop, and uses the resulting digital prints to create textured collages. The final works live somewhere between sculpture and digital art. For "Mise-en-scene," his assemblages are displayed alongside the original sculptures and 3D objects from which they originated. The show is on view through May 16 at Last Rites.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List