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Preview: Above’s “Remix” at Inner State Gallery

London-based, internationally recognized street artist Above will debut his latest body work, “Remix,” at Inner State Gallery in Detroit for his first US solo show in five years this Friday, November 21. Known for his signature upward-pointing arrow, which Above has propagated in more than 100 cities since 2001, the anonymous artist is taking a new approach to his famous image for “Remix.”

London-based, internationally recognized street artist Above will debut his latest body work, “Remix,” at Inner State Gallery in Detroit for his first US solo show in five years this Friday, November 21. Known for his signature upward-pointing arrow, which Above has propagated in more than 100 cities since 2001, the anonymous artist is taking a new approach to his famous image for “Remix.”

During his two month residency in Detroit, Above was influenced by its musical history. He channeled this influence by “remixing” his widely recognized arrow. “Similar to how a DJ takes a sample of a Motown song and remixes it with a hip-hop beat to create a new feeling and sound, my intention for ‘Remix’ is to take the straight structure of the arrow and remix it with curvaceous wood cuts and contrasting color combinations, all while maintaining the uniformed integrity of the line,” Above said.

His latest works breathe new life into the repeating motif, outfitting it with hypnotizing designs. The vivid color and complex, delicately crafted patterns make for an eye catching display. “Detroit has style and a raw uncensored energy, there is no doubt about that. To debut this new style of work here in Detroit feels like a perfect fit. Detroit, as well as this body of work, are both growing and expanding into new dynamic directions,” said the artist.

“Remix” opens to the public Friday, November 21 at 7 p.m. and will run through December 26.

Photos courtesy of Inner State Gallery.

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