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Design Duo Loop.pH Creates Luminous, Interactive Installations

Interested in the intersection between tech and architecture, interdisciplinary design studio Loop.pH (composed of Mathias Gmachl and Rachel Wingfield) creates interactive, site-specific installations that allow the public to engage with budding technologies and scientific concepts in novel ways. One of their latest works, "Atmeture," was on view at the Letchworth Fire & Fright Festival, which took place on October 28 through November 6 in Letchworth, UK. "Atmeture" invited viewers to walk through an illuminated, porous tunnel in which fibers inflated and deflated with a breath-like motion. Though a bright, visual spectacle on the outside, the breathing work of art fostered a calming, meditative space in its interior.

Interested in the intersection between tech and architecture, interdisciplinary design studio Loop.pH (composed of Mathias Gmachl and Rachel Wingfield) creates interactive, site-specific installations that allow the public to engage with budding technologies and scientific concepts in novel ways. One of their latest works, “Atmeture,” was on view at the Letchworth Fire & Fright Festival, which took place on October 28 through November 6 in Letchworth, UK. “Atmeture” invited viewers to walk through an illuminated, porous tunnel in which fibers inflated and deflated with a breath-like motion. Though a bright, visual spectacle on the outside, the breathing work of art fostered a calming, meditative space in its interior.

Loop.pH’s latest works explore the ways that technological processes can mimic nature. Their recent exhibition, “PROCESS,” which was on view at Soho FuXing Plaza in Shanghai through November 16, shared a similar focus on organic, cell-like geometric sculptures. Currently, the duo is gearing up to debut their latest endeavor, “Osmo,” which will be on view on November 29, 6 p.m. – 12 a.m. in Canning Town, London for the special event Light Night Canning Town. Viewers will be invited to enter an inflatable structure with a mirrored, kaleidoscopic interior. Laser beams will create the illusion of the cosmos above. “It’s an experiment in totally transforming the experience of an awkward public space into something of wonder and tranquility,” described the artists.

“Atmeture,” Letchworth Fire & Fright Festival, Letchworth, UK:

“PROCESS,” Soho FuXing Plaza, Shanghai, China:

“Osmo,” Light Night Canning Town, London, UK:

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