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Preview: “Return of the Hot Pot Girls” by Katsuya Terada at GR2

Opening tomorrow, Giant Robot's GR2 brings back the pot-adorned girls of Japanese artist Katsuya Terada with "Return of the Hot Pot Girls." We originally covered his intricate black and white marker drawings back in 2011. A skilled draftsman, Terada is perhaps best known in the States for his character designs for the animated film Blood: The Last Vampire, Iron Man and Hellboy. His new pieces contrast simple materials of pencil on paper and wood with detailed renderings of girls wearing Japanese "nabe" (Japanese hot pot dishes) paired with ferocious beasts. Creatures like tigers, bears, and eagles appear mid-flight as they wind around the compostions, shown here in these cropped preview images.

Opening tomorrow, Giant Robot’s GR2 brings back the pot-adorned girls of Japanese artist Katsuya Terada with “Return of the Hot Pot Girls.” We originally covered his intricate black and white marker drawings back in 2011. A skilled draftsman, Terada is perhaps best known in the States for his character designs for the animated film Blood: The Last Vampire, Iron Man and Hellboy. His new pieces contrast simple materials of pencil on paper and wood with detailed renderings of girls wearing Japanese “nabe” (Japanese hot pot dishes) paired with ferocious beasts. Creatures like tigers, bears, and eagles appear mid-flight as they wind around the compostions, shown here in these cropped preview images. Notably, this exhibition also celebrates Terada’s 30th year as a professional illustrator.  “Return of the Hot Pot Girls” by Katsuya Terada opens at GR2 tomorrow, November 15th- and kicks off a series of events that you can read more about at the gallery website.

Terada’s original “Hot Pot Girls”:

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