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George Boojury’s Monumental Ink Paintings of Animals

New York-based artist George Boojury paints animals that often return the viewer's gaze. His large-scale ink works on paper (10 feet long is typical for one of his pieces) invite his audiences to confront majestic, wild creatures head-on. In setting up this interaction, the artist quietly prompts us to contemplate our relationship with the animal world. Boojury paints with great detail, mapping out every hair and wrinkle. Bob cats and buffalo pose nonchalantly against white backgrounds that evoke a photo studio. Though Boojury's imagery is stoic and straightforward, one can't help but be reminded of the perils wildlife faces as human activity further encroaches on its habitats.

New York-based artist George Boojury paints animals that often return the viewer’s gaze. His large-scale ink works on paper (10 feet long is typical for one of his pieces) invite his audiences to confront majestic, wild creatures head-on. In setting up this interaction, the artist quietly prompts us to contemplate our relationship with the animal world. Boojury paints with great detail, mapping out every hair and wrinkle. Bob cats and buffalo pose nonchalantly against white backgrounds that evoke a photo studio. Though Boojury’s imagery is stoic and straightforward, one can’t help but be reminded of the perils wildlife faces as human activity further encroaches on its habitats.

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