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Preview: “The Great Escape” by Peter Gronquist at Joseph Gross Gallery

Opening tomorrow at Joseph Gross Gallery, Peter Gronquist's "The Great Escape" marks a departure from the taxidermy animal sculptures that he's known for. The exhibition will feature a series of color-field-like paintings on plexiglass, as well as abstract 3D pieces and free-standing animal sculptures. As these works are so dramatically different from his previous pieces (featured here), it is a remarkable change for Gronquist that links his past and present artwork.

Opening tomorrow at Joseph Gross Gallery, Peter Gronquist’s “The Great Escape” marks a departure from the taxidermy animal sculptures that he’s known for. The exhibition will feature a series of color-field-like paintings on plexiglass, as well as abstract 3D pieces and free-standing animal sculptures. As these works are so dramatically different from his previous pieces (featured here), it is a remarkable change for Gronquist that links his past and present artwork. The title itself makes a reference to his new aesthetic, described as ironic, conceptual, and figurative. If we consider his installations as a literal narrative, then these pieces could be their emotional interpretation. They have a similar, visceral quality that Gronquist calls a “liberation”.

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