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Hilary White’s Cosmic Assemblage Series, “Seer”

In her latest series, “Seer,” mixed-media artist Hilary White explores the possibilities of scientific progress and our faith in its explanation of reality. With her unique combination of painting and sculpture, her works have a cosmic feel to them, like portals into other worlds. By combining bright glossy colors with actual light sources and mirrors, her sculptures glow and come alive, becoming a mesmerizing bit of eye candy for the viewer to lose themselves in.

In her latest series, “Seer,” mixed-media artist Hilary White explores the possibilities of scientific progress and our faith in its explanation of reality. With her unique combination of painting and sculpture, her works have a cosmic feel to them, like portals into other worlds. By combining bright glossy colors with actual light sources and mirrors, her sculptures glow and come alive, becoming a mesmerizing bit of eye candy for the viewer to lose themselves in.

The series also includes two screen prints and a video. Although the pieces lose a dimension, they maintain every bit of the psychedelic awe found in her other pieces. The screen prints use geometric shapes and vivid colors to spellbind, similar to her 3D work. The video goes in the opposite direction, maintaining interest with a constantly changing collage of moving images.

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