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Robert Bösch’s Playful Photography in the Pennine Alps

Swiss photographer Robert Bösch captures his mountain climbing adventures in picturesque destinations across the world. While much of his work consists of conventional landscape photography and documentation of extreme sports, his fine art and advertising photography puts a playful spin on the aforementioned genres.

Swiss photographer Robert Bösch captures his mountain climbing adventures in picturesque destinations across the world. While much of his work consists of conventional landscape photography and documentation of extreme sports, his fine art and advertising photography puts a playful spin on the aforementioned genres.

Bösch recently did a photo series for climbing gear brand Mammut featuring a group of climbers and skiers enacting coordinated physical stunts. Dressed in red, his subjects stand out against the pristine snow of the Pennine Alps. Bösch choreographed the climbers in humorous and unexpected ways. In one photo, we see them forming the outlines of the Earth’s continents amid a snowy backdrop while in another, they scale a mountain while collectively forming the shape of an arrow. Using a drone, Bösch even took an aerial portrait on the peak of the Matterhorn. Check out the photo series below.

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