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On View: Hueman, Erik Jones, and Alex Yanes at Joseph Gross Gallery

Hueman, Erik Jones (HF Vol. 27 cover artist) , and Alex Yanes recollect their various artistic beginnings in "So Far, So Good", now on view at Joseph Gross gallery. Notably, the show also marks each artists' first in the famed Chelsea, New York area. Though having followed very different career paths, they have each arrived at bold and colorful palettes. Check out more photos after the jump!

Hueman, Erik Jones (HF Vol. 27 cover artist) , and Alex Yanes recollect their various artistic beginnings in “So Far, So Good”, now on view at Joseph Gross gallery. When we visited his studio just days ago, he shared his process behind this new, bold figurative imagery that combines abstraction with realism. Some of his pieces leave out the figure altogether, also eye catching but with added tension. Notably, the show also marks each artists’ first in the famed Chelsea, New York area. Alex Yanes’ background in graffiti and cartoons is clear in his musical 12ft totem pole- a massive functional piece made out of 19 cartoony, Art Deco-style artworks. Hueman has created an impressive 18 new paintings influenced by her experiences in the street art world. Blanketed in her signature cloud-like fluorescence, her portraits represent a stream of consciousness. It can be loosely interpreted as the artist’s own autobiography, one that tells the story of being ‘hueman’. Though having followed very different career paths, they have each arrived at bold and colorful palettes.

Hueman:



Erik Jones:



Alex Yanes:



“So Far, So Good” by Hueman, Erik Jones, and Alex Yanes is now on view at Joseph Gross Gallery through November 1st.

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