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Preview: Camilla D’Errico and Hikari Shimoda’s “Niji Bambini” at Cotton Candy Machine

Though their styles differ, Hikari Shimoda (featured in HF Vol. 29) and Camilla D'Errico each use a fluorescent color palette and childlike, illustrative imagery to apprehend adult anxieties. The two artists teamed up for their two-person show "Niji Bambini" (which combines Japanese and Italian, the artists' native tongues, to translate to "Rainbow Children"), opening at Brooklyn's Cotton Candy Machine on October 10.

Though their styles differ, Hikari Shimoda (featured in HF Vol. 29) and Camilla D’Errico each use a fluorescent color palette and childlike, illustrative imagery to apprehend adult anxieties. The two artists teamed up for their two-person show “Niji Bambini” (which combines Japanese and Italian, the artists’ native tongues, to translate to “Rainbow Children”), opening at Brooklyn’s Cotton Candy Machine on October 10.

The show marks a turning point for D’Errico, who created a new series of paintings on panel the artist says were intended to capture a sense of movement. She treated the panels like 3D objects, continuing the work around the raised edges. Shimoda presents new paintings and work on paper. Using her work as a catharsis, she says: “I need manga-like characters and cute colors or subjects as a ‘common language’ to represent serious aspects of this world.”

“Niji Bambini” opens October 10 and will be on view through November 9 at Brooklyn’s Cotton Candy Machine.

Hikari Shimoda

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