Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Preview: Camilla D’Errico and Hikari Shimoda’s “Niji Bambini” at Cotton Candy Machine

Though their styles differ, Hikari Shimoda (featured in HF Vol. 29) and Camilla D'Errico each use a fluorescent color palette and childlike, illustrative imagery to apprehend adult anxieties. The two artists teamed up for their two-person show "Niji Bambini" (which combines Japanese and Italian, the artists' native tongues, to translate to "Rainbow Children"), opening at Brooklyn's Cotton Candy Machine on October 10.

Though their styles differ, Hikari Shimoda (featured in HF Vol. 29) and Camilla D’Errico each use a fluorescent color palette and childlike, illustrative imagery to apprehend adult anxieties. The two artists teamed up for their two-person show “Niji Bambini” (which combines Japanese and Italian, the artists’ native tongues, to translate to “Rainbow Children”), opening at Brooklyn’s Cotton Candy Machine on October 10.

The show marks a turning point for D’Errico, who created a new series of paintings on panel the artist says were intended to capture a sense of movement. She treated the panels like 3D objects, continuing the work around the raised edges. Shimoda presents new paintings and work on paper. Using her work as a catharsis, she says: “I need manga-like characters and cute colors or subjects as a ‘common language’ to represent serious aspects of this world.”

“Niji Bambini” opens October 10 and will be on view through November 9 at Brooklyn’s Cotton Candy Machine.

Hikari Shimoda

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles

Corey Helford Gallery in Los Angeles just announced that they are moving to a new space, and they are saying goodbye to their Circa gallery with one of their most popular group exhibitions, "Art Collector Start Kit 3". Opening this Saturday, the exhibit (previously covered here) annually showcases smaller works from both well established and new names in the New Contemporary scene. This year's show is no less eclectic and presents 12" x 12" sized pieces from Brandi Milne, Hannah Yata, Hikari Shimoda (HF Vol. 29), Hirabayashi Takahiro, KiSung Koh, Korin Faught, Lori Nelson, Lu Cong, Naoto Hattori (HF Vol. 7 and 35), Yoh Nagao, and Yoko d'Holbachie (HF Vol. 6 cover artist), among over 30 artists.
In her paintings and ink drawings of anthropomorphous forms, Belarusian artist Alina Kunitsyna shares her personal fascination with people, and the ways in which we can simultaneously conceal and express our inward nature. Her series portrays figures obscured within garments, blankets and decorative fabrics, their faces always hidden from our view. And while her subjects may carry an air of mystery, it is through the expressions of their outer shells that we may begin to gain access to their inner worlds.
Carl Randall captures the energy and heartbeats of London and Tokyo through his crowded paintings, each figure its own portrait of a real pedestrian in his or her respective city. Toying with perspective, his recent works also implement the architecture and skylines of the inhabited metro area.
Jonathan Chapline's paintings emulate early computer graphics, while drawing upon the history of art in his work. The artist uses depth and shadows to add further mystique and drama to his scenes, moving between still-life and figurative narratives.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List