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On View: “Walldayallday” by Kiel Johnson at Mark Moore Gallery

Kiel Johnson (HF Vol. 14) currently has a solo exhibition of new drawings on view at Mark Moore Gallery, titled "Walldayallday". This show demonstrates his signature, elaborate execution of layered narratives. His drawings borderline the obsessive, exhibiting a wild curiosity with mechanical aesthetics. Setting these pieces apart however are their organic quality. In fact, Johnson looked to nature for the inspiration, the system of bee populations. A practiced bee keeper himself, Johnson intimately understands the structured yet chaotic world of bee society. His imagery represents this swarming micro universe, and draws a parrallel to our own modern relationship with industry.

Kiel Johnson (HF Vol. 14) currently has a solo exhibition of new drawings on view at Mark Moore Gallery, titled “Walldayallday”. This show demonstrates his signature, elaborate execution of layered narratives. His drawings borderline the obsessive, exhibiting a wild curiosity with mechanical aesthetics. Setting these pieces apart however are their organic quality. In fact, Johnson looked to nature for the inspiration, the system of bee populations. A practiced bee keeper himself, Johnson intimately understands the structured yet chaotic world of bee society. His imagery represents this swarming micro universe, and draws a parrallel to our own modern relationship with industry. For the artist, we are at risk of losing control of the very systems we have built. There is not much difference between the complexity of both honey bee and human societies- they feed each other, divide labor, enforce monarchy, tend to the young, fight invaders, and, in times of death, lose sight of morality. However safe and secure, they blindly abide by the rules that dictate their lives. Johnson dives into these profound analogies that humans share with bees, therefore better understanding our own world.

“Walldayallday” by Kiel Johnson is now on view at Mark Moore Gallery through November 8th, 2014.

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