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On View: Beau Stanton at the Crypt of Saint John the Baptist

Beau Stanton has new works he describes as "enigmatic illuminations", now on view at the Crypt of Saint John the Baptist in Bristol. Curated by Andy Phipps, the show's title "Tenebras Lux" refers to darkness and light, created by these lit panels emerging out of the crypt's dark, anicent space. The 9 stained glass panels combine elaborate oil painting with original medieval lead framework, inspired by Classical Antiquity and religious iconography that has long influenced Stanton.


Beau Stanton with his art on opening night.

Beau Stanton has new works he describes as “enigmatic illuminations”, now on view at the Crypt of Saint John the Baptist in Bristol. Curated by Andy Phipps, the show’s title “Tenebras Lux” refers to darkness and light, created by these lit panels emerging out of the crypt’s dark, anicent space. The 9 stained glass panels combine elaborate oil painting with original medieval lead framework, inspired by Classical Antiquity and religious iconography that has long influenced Stanton. They are then independently lit with LED light frames, creating an interesting juxtaposition between old and new techniques. Stanton first visited the venue last year and was hooked. The photos he took of the architecture, stone carvings, and ornaments were later incorporated into the designs.

We asked him to describe the experience of this site specific installation in his own words: “The venue is the Crypt of Saint John the Baptist which dates back to the 14th century. You enter through a very low door, down a few steps, into a low vaulted room where you immediately feel like you’re in a very ancient space. There are windows on one side of the space however I chose to exhibit the works on the opposite wall in order to illuminate the blank walls and recessed alcoves. The space has some really interesting stone carvings that I referenced in the work including a winged skull and foliate green man head. The dim lighting and low vaulted ceilings make an ideal space to show this body of work.” Stanton’s next showing at StolenSpace gallery will feature his stained glass work along with traditional paintings and painted objects, as well as a new projected animation opening October 9th.

“Tenebras Lux” by Beau Stanton is now on view at The Crypt of St John the Baptist, Quay Street, Bristol, BS1 2EZ through October 5th.

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