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Kyuin Shim’s Sculptures and Digital Art Alter the Human Body

Based in Seoul, Korea, Kyuin Shim is a digital artist and sculptor who executes dark and poignant visions by altering the human body. His latest sculptural series "Black Black" features several monochromatic renditions of mannequin-like figures whose bodies seem to disintegrate before one's eyes. In Korean, the title of the series has two meanings: "Black" and "Sound of Crying." The characters' flesh becomes consumed by bubbling matter that eventually turns into a downpour of water from their limbs and orifices. A recent series of digital 3D renderings, "Small Place," similarly abstracts the human body, this time in all white. Featuring different groupings of feet sticking out from under a cubicle-like prism, the piece evokes the smothering closeness of an unhealthy relationship. Take a look at some of Shim's work below.

Based in Seoul, Korea, Kyuin Shim is a digital artist and sculptor who executes dark and poignant visions by altering the human body. His latest sculptural series “Black Black” features several monochromatic renditions of mannequin-like figures whose bodies seem to disintegrate before one’s eyes. In Korean, the title of the series has two meanings: “Black” and “Sound of Crying.” The characters’ flesh becomes consumed by bubbling matter that eventually turns into a downpour of water from their limbs and orifices. A recent series of digital 3D renderings, “Small Place,” similarly abstracts the human body, this time in all white. Featuring different groupings of feet sticking out from under a cubicle-like prism, the piece evokes the smothering closeness of an unhealthy relationship. Take a look at some of Shim’s work below.

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