Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Symbolic Fairytale Portraits by Chang Chia-Ying

There's a new generation of Taiwanese artists remixing modern ideas into their artwork, stepping away from visual traditions. We see it in Lo Chan Peng’s frightening, fashionable muses (covered here), Liao Chi-yu's video art that references 17th century Dutch still life- and Chang Chia-Ying. Her Russian doll-like portraits of animals and chubby children stare into the distance with hollow, glazed over expressions on their faces. Likewise, the viewer is invited to look through them; their torsos are a window into an alternate reality. They are surrounded by mysterious fairytale gardens, inspired by the cartoons Chia-Ying watched as a child.

There’s a new generation of Taiwanese artists remixing modern ideas into their artwork, stepping away from visual traditions. We see it in Lo Chan Peng’s frightening, fashionable muses (covered here), Liao Chi-yu’s video art that references 17th century Dutch still life- and Chang Chia-Ying. Her Russian doll-like portraits of animals and chubby children stare into the distance with hollow, glazed over expressions on their faces. Likewise, the viewer is invited to look through them; their torsos are a window into an alternate reality. They are surrounded by mysterious fairytale gardens, inspired by the cartoons Chia-Ying watched as a child.

Her paintings exhibit a mixture of pop culture and culturally identifiable motifs such as Jiaolong, like a mermaid with a serpent’s tail, and Taiwanese rock monkeys, a symbol of versatility.  There is a religious ambiguity about them as well, representing her inner exploration sparked by new life experiences. In her own words, “My works reveal a short circuit situation. Why do I say that is a short circuit situation, that is because every single symbol in a work seems to have its own mission, is doing something, is performing its own story; but the stories are cut, they are not precisely connected, cannot be tagged with chronological order; the stories play according to observers’ thoughts. Cartoon art is flat, like a freeze-frame, there is not much to describe behind the frame, comparing to this lack of significance I pursue a polysemous significance.”

Meta
Topics
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
As a tribute to this “most wonderful time of the year” artists Lauren YS and Makoto Chi have created twenty-eight works (and a mural) for their new “Five Poisons” exhibition. We’ve interviewed the artists about the work. Click image above to read it, or else.
With a mix of dark humor and an impressive skill at creating inviting, yet dangerous worlds, the artist known as Bub has caught our eye. Click above to read our new interview with the artist and his new body of work, before it's too late.
We live in strange times and artists Michael Kerbow and Mike Davis both have something in common: they use surrealism and time travel to address modern and existential issues. Click above to read the Hi-Fructose exclusive interviews with painters Mike Davis and Michael Kerbow about their respective solo showings.
Artist and animation director Joe Vaux paints what he likes. His personal work is teeming with impish demons. His cheerful hellscapes are populated with lost souls, sharp toothed monstrosities, and swarms of wrong-doers. And yet, there’s an innocence to all of this. Click to read the Hi-Fructose exclusive interview with Joe Vaux.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List