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Opening Night: “Open to the Public” by Clayton Brothers at Mark Moore Gallery

On Saturday at Mark Moore gallery, Rob and Christian Clayton aka Clayton Brothers brought together an expansive body of eclectic work, "Open to the Public" (previewed here). The exhibition includes everything from miniature drawing, painting, sculptures, interactive video and an installation that is like a twisted child's playroom. The brothers credit their thrift shop "mecca", the Sun Thrift Store in Sunland, CA as the visual inspiration.

On Saturday at Mark Moore gallery, Rob and Christian Clayton aka Clayton Brothers brought together an expansive body of eclectic work, “Open to the Public” (previewed here). The exhibition includes everything from miniature drawing, painting, sculptures, interactive video and an installation that is like a twisted child’s playroom. The brothers credit their thrift shop “mecca”, the Sun Thrift Store in Sunland, CA as the visual inspiration.

Clayton Brothers, Rob and Christian Clayton, on opening night.

Their show is a departure from more illustrative works in favor of interpreting the organized chaos of a second hand store and its consumers. Their combined color palette and unusual, abstract figurative drawings lend well to this concept, and through the shared experience of an exhibit, create a singular, symbiotic piece of art. It recalls their 2013 exhibition “I’m OK”, which redefined “portraiture” through the use of found objects from their every day lives.  With this new mixture of objects, the brothers have created an offbeat portrait of consumerism, and in a way, American culture over the years.

“Open to the Public” by Clayton Brothers exhibits at Mark Moore gallery from August 16th through September 27th, 2014.

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