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Rugged Sculptures by Christian Zucconi Deconstruct the Human Body

From sculpture to photography and video art, every aspect of Italian artist Christian Zucconi’s work is devoted to the study of human flesh and its many evolutions. His sculpture is particularly strong in its portrayal of decay and deconstruction, as much of his recent work, such as his latest Corpo and Leviathan, displays the human figure in a state of tangible decomposition and subtle regeneration expressed through stitched-up parts, rugged textures and missing body parts.

From sculpture to photography and video art, every aspect of Italian artist Christian Zucconi’s work is devoted to the study of human flesh and its many evolutions. His sculpture is particularly strong in its portrayal of decay and deconstruction, as much of his recent work, such as his latest Corpo and Leviathan, displays the human figure in a state of tangible decomposition and subtle regeneration expressed through stitched-up parts, rugged textures and missing body parts.

This deconstructed look is the result of Zucconi’s original technique, which he dubbed Kenoclastic. This method, developed by the artist in 2007, involves the destruction of an already completed sculpture. The remains are later put back together in a loose way, precisely to resemble its broken state. This process, together with his materials of choice (Persian travertine, iron, wax, bone and wood), further adds to this idea that the body undergoes copious amounts to deteriorating experiences (both physical and mental) yet has the ability to heal many times over.

On the other hand, his bodies might be considered homages to the Mount Vesuvius’ victims in Italy’s Pompeii in 79 AD. Similar to the calcified bodies affected by the natural disaster, Zucconi’s realistic sculptures depict imperfect yet somewhat intact forms that have survived physical erosion.


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