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Preview: “Nemora” by Juliette Losq at the Fine Art Society Contemporary

The photo-realistic works by British artist Juliette Losq (covered here) are like a portal to another world. Losq’s oil paintings and drawings on paper of forests are unique in her aggressive treatment of the medium. Her upcoming solo exhibition, “Nemora”, opening September 12th at the Fine Art Society Contemporary in London, focuses on this act of chaos in the wilderness. Her three new installations for the show are inspired by Rococo imagery and 18th-19th century Gothic architecture, visual styles influenced by faith, wealth and power.

The photo-realistic works by British artist Juliette Losq (covered here) are like a portal to another world. Losq’s oil paintings and drawings on paper of forests are unique in her aggressive treatment of the medium. Her upcoming solo exhibition, “Nemora”, opening September 12th at the Fine Art Society Contemporary in London, focuses on this act of chaos in the wilderness. Her three new installations for the show are inspired by Rococo imagery and 18th-19th century Gothic architecture, visual styles influenced by faith, wealth and power. Losq takes gothic objects like a fireplace, a grandfather clock, and the venue’s entire ground floor and creates a forest clearing with her work. It almost look like old wallpaper, but it is a wave of tumbling found materials with hand drawn landscapes. This sudden and dramatic change in environments rebels against order and the mundane with a malevolent fantasy. The result is what Losq calls a “nemus”, a pasture or grove dedicated to the sacrifice and worship of woodland deities. It is all part of an illusion meant to preserve an almost-forgotten past.

Images by Juliette Losq, courtesy of The Fine Art Society.

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