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“Monstrous Days” New Painting Series by Jason Limon

Since January, Texas based artist Jason Limon has been hard at work on a new character driven narrative, “Monstrous Days”. When we last caught up with him, it was before his 2013 solo “Foretell”, focused on strange, hybrid characters in nightmarish imagery. His work always has a cinematic quality like an apocalyptic 1950s monster film that was never made. Classic movie monsters are traditionally an antagonistic force to be reckoned with who demand empathy from the viewer. Limon mixes these references with the inspiration he finds in equally perplexing nature. Take a look after the jump.

Since January, Texas based artist Jason Limon has been hard at work on a new character driven narrative, “Monstrous Days”.  When we last caught up with him, it was before his 2013 solo “Foretell”, focused on strange, hybrid characters in nightmarish imagery.  His work always has a cinematic quality like an apocalyptic 1950s monster film that was never made.  Classic movie monsters are traditionally an antagonistic force to be reckoned with who demand empathy from the viewer.  Limon mixes these references with the inspiration he finds in equally perplexing nature.  The result is child-like monsters who are follies of mankind’s pollution and ignorance. Through humor, Limon is exploring themes of life, death, and the unknown. His world is almost completely devoid of human life, and that’s not necessarily an unhappy ending. He shares, “Pretty much all the art I’ll be making this year will be based on monsters and crypto-zoology, some roughly based on actual stories and others from my own head. The aim is by the end of the year that I have developed a good group of these creatures from short stories and set it all up to be published. As I go through and develop this more narrative series of paintings I will create and release five or so small, 5″ x 7″ paintings I call “Cryptidbits” on a monthly basis.”

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