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Preview: Luke Cornish’s “Louder Than Words” at StolenSpace Gallery

After following a photojournalist through Lebanon during the height of the Syrian civil war in 2013, Australian artist Luke Cornish created his latest body of work as a response to the violence he witnessed as well as a testament to the power of hope in a time of conflict. His new stencil paintings will debut in his solo show, "Louder Than Words," at StolenSpace Gallery in London on August 8.

After following a photojournalist through Lebanon during the height of the Syrian civil war in 2013, Australian artist Luke Cornish created his latest body of work as a response to the violence he witnessed as well as a testament to the power of hope in a time of conflict. His new stencil paintings will debut in his solo show, “Louder Than Words,” at StolenSpace Gallery in London on August 8.

Under the photojournalist’s wing, Cornish was able to gain access to all sides of the conflict, shooting portraits of the Hezbollah militants, civilian refugees as well as reporters and media personnel. While his paintings (which are made using as many as 85 hand-cut stencils to create a sense of dimensionality) aim to capture the conflict objectively, one can’t help but get a sense of fear from the armed figures who stand in stark contrast contrast to the clean, white backgrounds. His takeaway from the trip? Cornish hopes his new work will inspire viewers to think beyond the media’s messages and combat xenophobic attitudes towards the Middle East.

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