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ROA’s New Mural at the Ifö Center in Bromölla, Sweden

A windowless gap on the wall of the large Ifö Center building in Bromölla, Sweden looks like a perfectly-suited nest for ROA's latest mural, a gigantic T. rex skeleton. A former factory with an austere exterior, the spacious building was converted into a cultural center by artists Teresa Holmberg and Jonathan Haner in 2011. The duo is currently developing an artist residency there as well as multi-use studio and exhibition spaces, and ROA's is the first mural on their walls. Known for his black-and-white animal portraits, ROA, who's always on the move, says he typically gets inspiration from the local species of the area he's visiting. While the T. rex is not native to Bromölla, the municipality has been the site of many fossil discoveries that have been a source of hometown pride in the small village.

A windowless gap on the wall of the large Ifö Center building in Bromölla, Sweden looks like a perfectly-suited nest for ROA’s latest mural, a gigantic T. rex skeleton. A former factory with an austere exterior, the spacious building was converted into a cultural center by artists Teresa Holmberg and Jonathan Haner in 2011. The duo is currently developing an artist residency there as well as multi-use studio and exhibition spaces, and ROA’s is the first mural on their walls. Known for his black-and-white animal portraits, ROA, who’s always on the move, says he typically gets inspiration from the local species of the area he’s visiting. While the T. rex is not native to Bromölla, the municipality has been the site of many fossil discoveries that have been a source of hometown pride in the small village.

Photos by Henrik Haven.

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