Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Valle’s “Heads” Series Dissects the Intricacies of Our Facial Expressions

Valentin Leonida (Valle) is a Bucharest-born 3D modeler and illustrator whose characters haunt imaginations. In his most recent series, “Heads,” Valle created five images revealing the interior of the human face as it makes emotional expressions. Titled “No.1 Rhinocerus (after Dürer),” “No.2 Melancholia,” “No. 3 Restless,” “No. 4 Concentration,” and “No. 5 Serpent Mind,” the drawings and their evocative labels prompt curiosity. One wonders if the furrowed tension in “Concentration” is revealed on one’s own face, or if the emotional state is only made visible when Valle's golden medical contraption pulls back the skin like a veil.

Valentin Leonida (Valle) is a Bucharest-born 3D modeler and illustrator whose characters haunt imaginations. In his most recent series, “Heads,” Valle created five images revealing the interior of the human face as it makes emotional expressions. Titled “No.1 Rhinocerus (after Dürer),” “No.2 Melancholia,” “No. 3 Restless,” “No. 4 Concentration,” and “No. 5 Serpent Mind,” the drawings and their evocative labels prompt curiosity. One wonders if the furrowed tension in “Concentration” is revealed on one’s own face, or if the emotional state is only made visible when Valle’s golden medical contraption pulls back the skin like a veil.

Other characters by Valle occupy similar grotesque realities, as do “Heads.” A droopy eyed Mrs. Claus looks away from the viewer in casual suspicion; a wide-eyed, gapped-tooth “Kawstitch” (after Chris Sanders’ “Stitch” from the Disney Cartoon) has an alien-sensibility that when depicted in 3D, loses the innocence of Sanders’ 2D version; and a “Robo” toy, whose energy clock errs on half-full, stares into the distance with eyes at half mast. Each created with a discernable and distinct personality, Valle’s characters are united by a tinge of wary experience, antithetical to the viewer’s expectations of the familiar figures.

 

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Javier Arres, an illustrator and graphic designer living in Madrid, Spain, crafts animated GIFs that often depict hyperdetailed, fantastical machines. The artist has his own moniker for these animations: “visual toys.” Whether it’s a wild coffee-maker or a roving entertainment bus, the artist builds GIFs that require dozens of loops to fully comprehend.
Illustrator Mad Meg constructs massive drawings that contain layers upon layers. She often uses insect heads as a recurring visual theme, adapting even pieces from art history into new works and satire. But further than that, pieces like “Patriarch No. 4,” at 39 inches by 79 inches, contain bewildering detail on a micro level.
San Francisco based artist Velia De Iuliis draws her inspiration from an inherent curiosity for all living things, and her colorful gouache illustrations are a tribute to the animals that she admires. Her work interprets their energy into abstract compositions that juxtapose the organic flow of nature with naturally occurring geometric forms like diamonds, ellipses and diagonal lines. "My work reflects what has fascinated me throughout my life. Themes of symmetry and patterns found in nature as well as nature itself are the avenues that both inspire and captivate me. Science, philosophy and art are tightly bound but to better understand humanity I have to first understand the natural world we live in, she says.
Jenna Andersen, an artist/illustrator based in Williamsburg, Va., creates immersive, hyperdetailed scenes, often with surreal overtones. The artist often injects only pops of color into her personal work, rendering natural backdrops in intricate linework, with her animal and human subjects as the pieces’ points of entry. In other works, these typically monochromatic settings are given lush, gouache hues.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List