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Preview: IMPACTS! Japanese Exhibition at Zane Bennett Contemporary Art

Opening July 25th in collaboration with Tokyo's Mizuma Art Gallery, Zane Bennett Contemporary Art brings us a show by emerging Japanese artists and legends alike. IMPACTS! takes a look at work created between 2008 through today by names to put on your radar- Amano Yoshitaka, Ai Yamaguchi, Ishii Toru, Kaneno Tomiyuki, and Ishihara Nanami shown below. You may already be familiar with Ai Yamaguchi (featured here), and Amano Yoshitaka, famous for his designs for the Final Fantasy video games. Their works are filled with warring heroes, sirens and monsters drawn from mythology; some mix traditional Japanese folk tales with fantasy elements, while the new generation progressively exhibits Western influences.

Opening July 25th in collaboration with Tokyo’s Mizuma Art Gallery, Zane Bennett Contemporary Art brings us a show by emerging Japanese artists and legends alike. IMPACTS! takes a look at work created between 2008 through today by names to put on your radar- Amano Yoshitaka, Ai Yamaguchi, Ishii Toru, Kaneno Tomiyuki, and Ishihara Nanami shown below. You may already be familiar with Ai Yamaguchi (featured here), and Amano Yoshitaka, famous for his designs for the Final Fantasy video games. Their works are filled with warring heroes, sirens and monsters drawn from mythology; some mix traditional Japanese folk tales with fantasy elements, while the new generation progressively exhibits Western influences. Among these “newcomers” is Ai Kato (who sometimes goes by “ai☆madonna”) recognized for her provocative female subjects that first appeared in Tokyo street graffiti. She will perform a live painting at the opening, kick-starting a series of performances, lectures, and film screenings. The event promises to be more like a contemporary Japanese art festival than a group exhibition, an opportunity for American fans to see pieces by otherwise rare talents. Despite their dramatically different visual styles, collectively, these are artists who test boundaries and will provide insight to Japan’s political and social environment.


©Ai Yamaguchi, Ninyu Works, Courtesy the artist and Mizuma Art Gallery.


©Ai Yamaguchi, Ninyu Works, Courtesy the artist and Mizuma Art Gallery.


©Amano Yoshitaka, Courtesy the artist and Mizuma Art Gallery.


©Amano Yoshitaka, Courtesy the artist and Mizuma Art Gallery.


©Kaneko Tomiyuki, Courtesy the artist and Mizuma Art Gallery.


©Ishii Toru, Courtesy the artist and Mizuma Art Gallery.


©Ishihara Nanami, Courtesy the artist and Mizuma Art Gallery.

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