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Preview: “DUBL TRUBL” Street Art Show at Urban Spree Gallery

Urban Spree Gallery in Berlin is now making preparations for their huge street art show opening September 18th, “DUBL TRUBL”. Curated by artist Dscreet, the exhibition will boast 80 names you might be familiar with- Miss Van & Ciro, Ghostpatrol & Merda, Lush & Dscreet, Tizer & Ebot, Anthony Lister, Dabs and Myla, Pure Evil, and many more. The project is aptly named in anticipation of ‘doubling up’ artists who will be collaborating in addition to showing new work. We previously reviewed Miss Van and Ciro’s collaborative work last September, making this an anniversary of sorts. The artists in this show are paired because of their clashing styles, rather than similarities, celebrating the spontaneity and improvisation that comes with collaboration. It’s always fun when artists who don't normally work together join efforts.

Urban Spree Gallery in Berlin is now making preparations for their huge street art show opening September 18th, “DUBL TRUBL”. Curated by artist Dscreet, the exhibition will boast 80 names you might be familiar with- Miss Van & Ciro, Ghostpatrol & Merda, Lush & Dscreet, Tizer & Ebot, Anthony Lister, Dabs and Myla, Pure Evil, and many more. The project is aptly named in anticipation of ‘doubling up’ artists who will be collaborating in addition to showing new work. We previously reviewed Miss Van and Ciro’s collaborative work last September, making this an anniversary of sorts. The artists in this show are paired because of their clashing styles, rather than similarities, celebrating the spontaneity and improvisation that comes with collaboration. It’s always fun when artists who don’t normally work together join efforts. Despite Urban Spree’s impressive art compound, as we’ve just seen with Pow! Wow! Taiwan (covered here and here), the colliding worlds of street art are infectious. Perhaps Germany will enjoy the exciting bonus of unplanned results. If you’re curious to see what 500 cans of spray paint looks like, check out the preview below.

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