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The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Katharine Morling Creates Illusion of Drawing with Ceramic Sculptures

Katharine Morling's monochromatic ceramic sculptures carefully utilize black lines to create the illusion of two-dimensionality. Morling sculpts mundane objects out of a brittle, white clay, laying them out like still lifes that resemble ballpoint pen doodles on paper. The doodle-like quality is an important aspect of the work. Morling isn't interested in building ceramic replicas of cameras or typewriters: Instead, she reinterprets them with her hands and her imagination, inviting us to consider how the objects that surround us shape our thinking.

Katharine Morling’s monochromatic ceramic sculptures carefully utilize black lines to create the illusion of two-dimensionality. Morling sculpts mundane objects out of a brittle, white clay, laying them out like still lifes that resemble ballpoint pen doodles on paper. The doodle-like quality is an important aspect of the work. Morling isn’t interested in building ceramic replicas of cameras or typewriters: Instead, she reinterprets them with her hands and her imagination, inviting us to consider how the objects that surround us shape our thinking.

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