Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Slinkachu Revists His Tiny Art Months Later

Bigger is better, unless you’re Slinkachu. The UK-based artist (previously posted on our Tumblr here) started placing his tiny figures around London back in 2006. Slinkachu sources these from a company that supplies model train products, and vintage 1960s toys, which he embellishes for his own purposes. He’s a big fan of artist Chris Ware, whose works also tend to use a vivid color palette and are full of meticulous detail. When we say tiny, we mean barely a centimeter high. Slinkachu has to use a magnifying glass to add details to his little people. If it wasn’t for his compelling photo series, they would be left completely undiscovered to passersby. He has photographed these humorous, miniature scenes all over the world in places like Cape Town, Doha, Berlin, and New York, to name a few. During the course of documenting his work, Slinkachu began to question: Just what happens to art that’s been abandoned on the street?

Bigger is better, unless you’re Slinkachu. The UK-based artist (previously posted on our Tumblr here) started placing his tiny figures around London back in 2006. Slinkachu sources these from a company that supplies model train products, and vintage 1960s toys, which he embellishes for his own purposes. He’s a big fan of artist Chris Ware, whose works also tend to use a vivid color palette and are full of meticulous detail. When we say tiny, we mean barely a centimeter high. Slinkachu has to use a magnifying glass to add details to his little people. If it wasn’t for his compelling photo series, they would be left completely undiscovered to passersby. He has photographed these humorous, miniature scenes all over the world in places like Cape Town, Doha, Berlin, and New York, to name a few. During the course of documenting his work, Slinkachu began to question: Just what happens to art that’s been abandoned on the street?


“Alpining”, six months later.

Rather than suffering defacement, Slinkachu noticed that nature began to take its course. In the case of his Fullham, London street installation “Alpining”, Slinkachu found that the artworks last quite a while. However, overtime, birds who are attracted to bright colors for their nests would ‘steal’ the figures, or the color mood would darken due to exposure, completely changing the dynamic. In the world of tiny street art, the work takes on a ‘life’ of its own. Slinkachu’s characters reflect the loneliness and melancholy of living in a big city- and over time, become more lost than before.

Can you spot Slinkachu’s latest work?:

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Based in Lisbon, Portugal, Bordalo II creates resourceful assemblages out of the junk he collects in his city's streets. Using a bit of spray paint, the artist configures the found objects into playful animal portraits. His street art work hybridizes muralism and sculpture. A portrait of an owl conceals layers of scrap metal; a painting of an apple contains bent bicycle tires, cans, wood and cardboard. Bordalo II's art brings whimsical visions to Lisbon's streets and invites viewers to imagine creative ways to reuse their discarded items.
Since Kamea Hadar and Defer collaborated last February on a mural in Honolulu for Pow Wow Hawaii, the two artists have joined forces in the studio for a new series of paintings currently on view at 1AM Gallery in San Francisco. Hadar's portraiture and Defer's otherworldly calligraphy complement each other almost seamlessly, as demonstrated by their most recent joint effort, "Paradise Lost."
Australian artist Beastman's murals flow like freeform doodles across building facades. Tessellating triangle patterns, organic, leaf-like shapes, and radiating beams of color morph into one another to create symmetrical, mandala-like designs. Beastman's latest work was spotted in the Re.Discover festival in Bunbury, Australia, which took place this past weekend. The new piece drapes a woven-looking pattern over a hexagonal building like a psychedelic koozie or quilt. Check out Beastman's latest murals and studio works below.
Having just come off their exhibition at Thinkspace Gallery in Los Angeles (covered here), Polish street art duo Sainer and Bezt, known as Etam Cru, recently completed their second major mural in the United States. Co-produced by Thinkspace and Branded Arts, their wall "Mr. Rooster" is a massive portrait of a young country boy with a rooster standing on his shoulders as he looks over the smoggy city of Los Angeles.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List