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Opening Night: JAZ’s “VINCULO” at BC Gallery

Currently on view at BC Gallery in Berlin, “VINCULO,” opened last Friday after the Argentinian artist JAZ (Franco Fasoli) completed his wildly affecting mural of a muscled, hunch-backed Minotaur crying out in what appears to be more likely help or defeat rather than glory. The two-story exhibition space is divided into two sections: in the basement, four-legged animals in various iterations – solo, running in packs, melded into a single abstract form – on blue backgrounds; and on the ground floor, larger-format paintings of ordinary men with animal heads fighting one another within the same monochrome settings.

Currently on view at BC Gallery in Berlin, “VINCULO,” opened last Friday after the Argentinian artist JAZ (Franco Fasoli) completed his wildly affecting mural of a muscled, hunch-backed Minotaur crying out in what appears to be more likely help or defeat rather than glory. The two-story exhibition space is divided into two sections: in the basement, four-legged animals in various iterations – solo, running in packs, melded into a single abstract form – on blue backgrounds; and on the ground floor, larger-format paintings of ordinary men with animal heads fighting one another within the same monochrome settings.

The exhibition title takes its name from the Spanish word for bond, and with the simple topical separation of works and use of repetition, the exhibition seeks to connect the harmoniously chaotic nature of animals with the arguably choreographed fight-movements of men.

In the animal paintings, each creature in a single pack shares the same coat pattern with his brothers. It may be said that though humans like to think of themselves as individuals, in the end, everyone dons the same stripes.

Images courtesy of BC Gallery/Phillipp Barth.


Process video of JAZ painting the mural

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