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David Stegmann’s New Murals Show Nature As a Force To Be Reckoned With

While it's possible to observe trees growing over the course of months and years, German artist David Stegmann aka Dust paints roots, branches and vines as sentient beings caught amid a state of evolution. In Dust's two latest murals, "Wohnzimmerwelten" and "Witness the Fitness," (both completed in Germany in the past two months) his otherworldly trees sprawl out across long walls (one of the pieces is 32 meters long) with force and momentum. The murals preceded the opening of Dust's current show, "Concrete Jungle," with Patricia Sandonis at Galerie Merkle in Stuttgart, Germany. Endowing plants with movement and speed is Dust's signature. The high-velocity branches take on new forms, reminding viewers of the powers that lie in the soil, the roots and the trees.

While it’s possible to observe trees growing over the course of months and years, German artist David Stegmann aka Dust paints roots, branches and vines as sentient beings caught amid a state of evolution. In Dust’s two latest murals, “Wohnzimmerwelten” and “Witness the Fitness,” (both completed in Germany in the past two months) his otherworldly trees sprawl out across long walls (one of the pieces is 32 meters long) with force and momentum. The murals preceded the opening of Dust’s current show, “Concrete Jungle,” with Patricia Sandonis at Galerie Merkle in Stuttgart, Germany. Endowing plants with movement and speed is Dust’s signature. The high-velocity branches take on new forms, reminding viewers of the powers that lie in the soil, the roots and the trees.

“Wohnzimmerwelten” in Staufen, Germany:

“Witness the Fitness”:

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