Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Daring Fairytale-like Portraits by Katerina Plotnikova

Moscow based photographer Katerina Plotnikova has been making a name for herself for her daring photos of young girls embracing wild beasts. (We first posted her work on our Facebook page.) Her haunting portraits are created with real, specially trained animals such as bears, owls, deer and foxes, blending surrealism with inspiration from fairytales. Perhaps our fascination with her images comes from a place we’ve almost forgotten, as deforestation and global warming become imminent threats to our planet. With each series, her work pushes the boundaries even further. Read more after the jump.

Moscow based photographer Katerina Plotnikova has been making a name for herself for her daring photos of young girls embracing wild beasts. (We first posted her work on our Facebook page.) Her haunting portraits are created with real, specially trained animals such as bears, owls, deer and foxes, blending surrealism with inspiration from fairytales. Perhaps our fascination with her images comes from a place we’ve almost forgotten, as deforestation and global warming become imminent threats to our planet. With each series, her work pushes the boundaries even further.

Like other photographers we’ve highlighted recently, Robert and Shana ParkeHarrison and Elena Kalis, Plotnikova’s work celebrates our deep relationship with nature and how important it is to preserve it. One of her new photographs portrays a model lying injured on a road broken by tropical rains in Thailand. Her use of the environment is stunningly beautiful, but we are looking at the result of global climate change. In others, an ice sheet melts and crumbles around the model as she sleeps- later rising anew as a sapling from a burnt tree. Plotnikova’s imagery not only reminds us of our planet’s fragility but ignites a beacon of hope. Her surreal photos of a more blissful time may actually be a dream for the future.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Paul Cristina’s arresting works use charcoal, acrylics, and oils on paper mounted on the canvas. The Cleveland-born, self-taught artists evolved his style from the study of books, music, films, photographs, and people he's encountered. The artist is currently based in Charleston, S.C.
Angela Gram’s oil paintings are alive with explorations of the natural world injected with distorted, vibrant sensibility. "The Past is Alive," a show running at Gallery Poulsen in Denmark from Feb. 24 through the end of March, collects a new set of kinetic works. This new collection “The Past is Alive," a show running at Gallery Poulsen in Denmark through “constant fascination with the monstrously surreal, expressed through her deconstructed animal kingdom.”
Lebanese photographer Serge Najjar notices geometric patterns in his day-to-day surroundings. Based in Beirut, his photographs capture instances of minimalist architecture with an emphasis on symmetry and repetition. But despite its focus on clean designs, his work includes evidence of human inhabitants in these austere edifices. With people peaking out of their doors and windows, the buildings come alive. The people in his work add individuality and quirkiness to his otherwise highly stylized presentation of Beirut, where cultural context is stripped away to highlight the city's modern, architectural elements.
This year, JR became one of the Olympic Games’ first artists in residence. And the French artist took the opportunity to a grand level with three massive sculptures scattered across Rio. JR’s black-and-white photos of athletes, erected with scaffolding, loom over passers-by, whether jumping over a building or plunging into the water. The images were installed in Flamengo, Botafogo, and Barra da Tijuca, respectively. JR was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 17.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List