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Preview: “Dark Matters” Featuring Robert Bowen, Caitlin Hackett and Dave Correia

There's something intrinsically horrifying about seeing the familiar mutated, spliced and perverted. Caitlin Hackett, Robert Bowen and Dave Correia's work certainly has this shock factor in common. The three artists, who are showing together in "Dark Matters" at San Francisco's Bash Contemporary on May 31, look to nature as their inspiration. But rather than depicting butterflies and daisies, their work collectively alludes to a world that's been polluted, mined, stripped of its forests and impregnated with nuclear waste.


Robert Bowen

There’s something intrinsically horrifying about seeing the familiar mutated, spliced and perverted. Caitlin Hackett, Robert Bowen and Dave Correia’s work certainly has this shock factor in common. The three artists, who are showing together in “Dark Matters” at San Francisco’s Bash Contemporary on May 31, look to nature as their inspiration. But rather than depicting butterflies and daisies, their work collectively alludes to a world that’s been polluted, mined, stripped of its forests and impregnated with nuclear waste.

Hackett’s watercolor and pencil works on paper feature swamp creatures with multiple limbs and eyes traversing through an environment that looks nearly uninhabitable. Bowen’s work ruminates on the fusion of technology and nature with his arsenal of animal-machine hybrids. Meanwhile, Correia’s oil paintings envelope animal and human characters in a viscous, textured coating of acidic colors. Take a look at our preview of the show below.


Robert Bowen


Robert Bowen


Robert Bowen’s studio


Caitlin Hackett


Caitlin Hackett in her studio


Caitlin Hackett


Dave Correia


Dave Correia


Dave Correia

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