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Opening Night: “Adrift” by Liz Brizzi at Thinkspace Gallery

French born artist Liz Brizzi held her first solo exhibition with Thinkspace Gallery (previewed here) on Saturday. “Adrift” continues her experimentation with urban landscapes in the form of painting and photo collage. This time, Brizzi went to Asia in search of inspiration. “I’ve always loved Japan. I went there with this exhibition in mind, with a plan in my head to create my own version of it,” shared Brizzi on opening night. Among the cities represented in Brizzi’s new work are Roppongi, Tokyo and the Damnoen Saduak floating marketplace in Thailand. Seemingly uninhabited, her work celebrates the architectural design and essence of a place long after we’re gone.

French born artist Liz Brizzi held her first solo exhibition with Thinkspace Gallery (previewed here) on Saturday. “Adrift” continues her experimentation with urban landscapes in the form of painting and photo collage. This time, Brizzi went to Asia in search of inspiration. “I’ve always loved Japan. I went there with this exhibition in mind, with a plan in my head to create my own version of it,” shared Brizzi on opening night. Among the cities represented in Brizzi’s new work are Roppongi, Tokyo and the Damnoen Saduak floating marketplace in Thailand. Seemingly uninhabited, her work celebrates the architectural design and essence of a place long after we’re gone. Even the drab LA River comes to life in a glaze of bright colors. Her creative process is almost like ‘rebuilding’ a memory. Back in her Los Angeles studio, she carefully trims her photographs and pieces them back together with acrylic washes on wood panel. The end result is a patchwork of complex imaginary structures.

Coinciding in the gallery’s project room is “Play” by another Los Angeles based painter, Jolene Lai. Her use of color is like ripples on the surface of water, emphasizing her unique filter of the world. Toys and imaginary creatures are a common motif, often playing a part in her subject’s dream or memory. Where Brizzi merely suggests the touch of invisible inhabitants, Lai casts her work with whimsical characters. Both offer a different interpretation of memories.

“Adrift” by Liz Brizzi exhibits at Thinkspace Gallery through May 17th, 2014.

Jolene Lai:

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