Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Opening Night: “Paper Teller” by Moneyless at Soze Gallery

Last Friday, Soze Gallery in Los Angeles debuted “Paper Teller”, new works by Italian street artist Moneyless (featured here). Moneyless is an artist who, as he describes it, “speaks through geometry.” His education in mathematics is a clear influence on his new work, but this is a twist on forms he’s been observing for several years. The circle artworks are new, blending concepts of math and science with the colors of 1970s art. Read more after the jump.

Last Friday, Soze Gallery in Los Angeles debuted “Paper Teller”, new works by Italian street artist Moneyless (featured here). Moneyless is an artist who, as he describes it, “speaks through geometry.” His education in mathematics is a clear influence on his new work, but this is a twist on forms he’s been observing for several years. The circle artworks are new, blending concepts of math and science with the colors of 1970s art. Until recently, Moneyless has been building installations made out of materials like ropes. He pointed out the subtle progression from creating shapes with found objects, comparing the fibers of a rope to his compass-like drawings. His “Ropes” series emphasized the geometry in nature that we take for granted.

Here, with “Paper Teller”, Moneyless looks to man-made geometry and the beauty of typography for ideas. He has taken letters and abstracted them into natural forms. These complex drawings are the product of a simple stencil that Moneyless drafted himself and traced over and over. In doing so, the drawings come to life, suspended in constant motion. If we consider Newton’s law of physics that the universe is always moving, then it’s possible to see how Moneyless draws the line between art and space.

“Paper Teller” by Moneyless at Soze Gallery is now on view until May 25, 2014.

 

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
12 years after artist Kent Twitchell painted Los Angeles' favorite "Freeway Lady" overlooking the 101 freeway, it was erased by a billboard company. Originally painted in 1974, the mural is a tribute to the artist's grandmother who lived in Hollywood. She is depicted holding a colorful, handmade afghan blanket that she gifted to Twitchell. In Hi-Fructose Vol. 37, we caught up with Twitchell during the piece's restoration, which was recently completed on October 10th.
We recently reviewed Andrew Schoultz's solo show at Hosfelt Gallery in San Francisco, "Blown to Bits," where he reflected on the chaos of world events through an apocalyptic lens. This past week, Empire Seven Studios commissioned Schoultz to do a mural in San Jose, CA that touches upon some of the same themes. Schoultz is an artist with his personal arsenal of symbolic motifs. In viewing his work across various media — from street art to installations to paintings — cohesive ideas begin to emerge through the recurring imagery. Schoultz juxtaposes symbols of wealth and grandeur — like Grecian vases, tigers, gold coins, and ships — with chaotic line work that resembles explosions. His work signals at a civilization in decline, mired by its own greed and hubris.
Currently on view at Jonathan LeVine Gallery in New York City is "Cruel Summer," an extensive showcase of artists with ties to the international graffiti and street art scenes. The show is curated by Roger Gastman, a graffiti writer turned filmmaker and author whose extensive credits include consulting producer of Banksy's Exit Through the Giftshop and co-curator of the major street art exhibition "Art in the Streets" at LA's MoCA. With humorous, playful works by Dabs Myla, Finok and HuskMitNavn, neon dreamscapes by Maya Hayuk and POSE and black-and-white flash tattoo drawings by Mike Giant, the exhibition demonstrates the broad scope of artists making their marks on the streets of cities across the world.
Andrew Schoultz's art is filled with chaotic imagery, expressing a rather dystopian vision through a variety of techniques, from sculpture to collage, street art to installations to paintings. Featured here on our blog, his eclectic work cultivates an arsenal of personal symbolism: fragments of dollar bills, fractured Grecian urns, ripped American flags, war horses, and slave ships are just a few of the symbols he uses to juxtapose Western culture with allusions to conflict and exploitation.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List