Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Gosia’s Ceramic Busts of Youthful Subjects

Toronto-based artist Gosia creates intimate moments with her collection of sculpted busts of youthful subjects. Made of gypsum and polymer clay, Gosia's sculptures leave traditional facial signifiers and theatrical dramatics behind, replacing them with expressions of much gentler subtlety. As if candidly stopped in time, the faces of her sculptures chisel into perpetuity the fleeting moment when a glance is first cast, the downward evasion of one’s gaze as the shade of familiar dismay momentarily prevails.

Toronto-based artist Gosia creates intimate moments with her collection of sculpted busts of youthful subjects. Made of gypsum and polymer clay, Gosia’s sculptures leave traditional facial signifiers and theatrical dramatics behind, replacing them with expressions of much gentler subtlety. As if candidly stopped in time, the faces of her sculptures chisel into perpetuity the fleeting moment when a glance is first cast, the downward evasion of one’s gaze as the shade of familiar dismay momentarily prevails.

Gosia delicately whittles dimension to the pupils, with several subjects positioned to look out in search of direction, and instills the sense that no one is immediately there to answer back. By keeping carvings of non-essential features minimal, the natural beauty of the human skin is accented, and even hair begins to appear like an embellishment. All other atypical additions take on majestic qualities: the richly pigmented flowers that graze one particular sculpture’s ivory lips appear as a swatch cut from an opulent garment. The perforated cloak that swathes over another girl’s head prompts the viewer to seek out her secrets; and rain, rather than simply splashing down and evaporating, oozes, drapes and binds.

Meta
Topics
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Illustrator-turned-fine artist Janice Sung’s figures seem at home amidst natural settings, whether in a lily pad pond or a garden, floating like a near-translucent milk specters. Her recent gallery showing at Gallery Nucleus in Los Angeles, the first using physical media by the artist. We asked the artist a few questions about her new body of work and about transitioning from digital to physical media. Click the above already and read the hifructose.com exclusive interview.
Hi-Fructose writer Zara Kand visits Coleccion SOLO in Spain for their latest Handle With Care exhibition. Click above to see the full report.
As a tribute to this “most wonderful time of the year” artists Lauren YS and Makoto Chi have created twenty-eight works (and a mural) for their new “Five Poisons” exhibition. We’ve interviewed the artists about the work. Click image above to read it, or else.
With a mix of dark humor and an impressive skill at creating inviting, yet dangerous worlds, the artist known as Bub has caught our eye. Click above to read our new interview with the artist and his new body of work, before it's too late.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List