Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

On View: Amanda Marie’s “I Was Just Thinking” at White Walls Gallery

Amanda Marie's emotionally-complex, yet innocent and playful imagery extends throughout the walls of White Walls Gallery for her first San Francisco solo show, "I Was Just Thinking." As opposed to the overtly sexual or political themes expected from stencil art, Amanda Marie's work comes forth with endearing, nostalgic visuals that have double meanings and expand on deeper issues of a more grown-up, serious caliber beyond what her juvenile subject matter suggests. Read more after the jump.

Amanda Marie’s emotionally-complex, yet innocent and playful imagery extends throughout the walls of White Walls Gallery for her first San Francisco solo show, “I Was Just Thinking.” As opposed to the overtly sexual or political themes expected from stencil art, Amanda Marie’s work comes forth with endearing, nostalgic visuals that have double meanings and expand on deeper issues of a more grown-up, serious caliber beyond what her juvenile subject matter suggests.

Basing her work on illustrations and characters found in iconic, mid-20th century children’s books, Amanda Marie opts to depict Modern American childhood in the form of ambiguous and non-linear narrative paintings. Using spray paint and original stencils, Amanda Marie modifies storybook-like characters by creating bizarre, unsettling situations. For instance, a big part of her work is fixated on images of little girls falling, perhaps alluding to Alice’s fall into the rabbit hole. Other works feature little boys and girls confined to their animal-hybrid bodies, which, by the way, are still perfectly outfitted in delicate sweaters and peter-pan collars. These modified images create interesting juxtapositions between innocence and worldly, inevitable corruption. These painterly and whimsical depictions of childhood gear towards a deeper understanding of adult themes that regard sexuality, loss of innocence, greed, happiness, envy and elation.

Meta
Topics
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Artist and animation director Joe Vaux paints what he likes. His personal work is teeming with impish demons. His cheerful hellscapes are populated with lost souls, sharp toothed monstrosities, and swarms of wrong-doers. And yet, there’s an innocence to all of this. Click to read the Hi-Fructose exclusive interview with Joe Vaux.
Vibrant and bold, Oscar Joyo’s latest body of work which was exhibited at Thinkspace Projects in Los Angeles, vibrates the retina; while delving into his childhood memories childhood in Malawi and themes of Afrofuturism.
Something interesting happens when when artists like Alan and Carolynda Macdonald, who have the painting fundamentals mastered, decide to subvert expectations and perplex a viewers expectations conceptually. Click to read the Hi-Fructose exclusive interview.
The concept of the Wunderkammer, aka The Cabinet Of Curiosities has been an artistic inspiration for some time, however a new show opening in November by Ryan Matthew Cohn and Jean Labourdette takes it up a notch with an exceptional show of sculptures and paintings based thematically on the subject. Click to read the new Hi-Fructose exclusive interview.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List