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The Art of Jen Mann

Named after flora or for ethereal actions of thesubconscious such as ‘sleepwalking,’ Canadian based artist Jen Mann createsenchanting portraits of women seeped in the natural world. Marking growth, decayand the freedom of the wild, the youthful nude women appear coupled withanimals or plant life, in some cases their bodies are vessels for newgrowth, revealing the cyclical nature of life. Paired with a muted colorpalette, the work speaks of both the majestic beauty of nature as well as the dreamyaesthetic of the subconscious. View more images after the jump.

Named after flora or for ethereal actions of the subconscious such as ‘sleepwalking,’ Canadian based artist Jen Mann creates enchanting portraits of women seeped in the natural world. Marking growth, decay and the freedom of the wild, the youthful nude women appear coupled with animals or plant life, in some cases their bodies are vessels for new growth, revealing the cyclical nature of life. Paired with a muted color palette, the work speaks of both the majestic beauty of nature as well as the dreamy aesthetic of the subconscious. View more images below.

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