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PULSE Art Fair Los Angeles 2011

The PULSE art fair launched its contemporary arts mission in Los Angeles last weekend, smartly coinciding with Art Platform and the Getty’s Pacific Standard Time initiative.  Committed to the promotion of large scale artworks and installations, the fair highlighted an impressive new roster of international galleries and artists from Los Angeles to Japan.  Among the most notable presentations were new works by Nate Frizzell and Joshua Petker at LeBasse Projects, Jen Stark’s rainbow paper creations at Cooper Cole Gallery, Kris Kuksi’s intriciate recycled toy sculptures at Joshua Liner, THREE’s melted doll works at Megumi-Ogita, to name a few.  While some exhibited new work, the majority represented their strengths with archival pieces from their best artists.  To a Los Angeles gallery regular, the real eye-openers came from out of reach places such as David B. Smith gallery in Colorado and Megumi-Ogita gallery in Ginza, Tokyo.  “We came here because Los Angeles people enjoy shocking art and pop-culture,” Megumi-Ogita told Hi-Fructose on Friday.  Like most exhibitors, they took a risk in hopes of creating a stir amongst new buyers and venues. - Caro

Jen Stark at Cooper Cole (formerly Show & Tell Gallery)

The PULSE art fair launched its contemporary arts mission in Los Angeles last weekend, smartly coinciding with Art Platform and the Getty’s Pacific Standard Time initiative.  Committed to the promotion of large scale artworks and installations, the fair highlighted an impressive new roster of international galleries and artists from Los Angeles to Japan.  Among the most notable presentations were new works by Nate Frizzell and Joshua Petker at LeBasse Projects, Jen Stark’s rainbow paper creations at Cooper Cole Gallery, Kris Kuksi’s intriciate recycled toy sculptures at Joshua Liner, THREE’s melted doll works at Megumi-Ogita, to name a few.  While some exhibited new work, the majority represented their strengths with archival pieces from their best artists.  To a Los Angeles gallery regular, the real eye-openers came from out of reach places such as David B. Smith gallery in Colorado and Megumi-Ogita gallery in Ginza, Tokyo.  “We came here because Los Angeles people enjoy shocking art and pop-culture,” Megumi-Ogita told Hi-Fructose on Friday.  Like most exhibitors, they took a risk in hopes of creating a stir amongst new buyers and venues. – Caro

PULSE Los Angeles Art Fair exhibited in Downtown Los Angeles from September 30 – October 3, 2011.

Gregory Euclide at David B. Smith Gallery

Kris Kuksi at Joshua Liner Gallery

Mike Stilkey for LeBasse Projects

THREE at Megumi Ogita Gallery

detail

Kris Lewis at David B. Smith Gallery

Kozyndan at Narwhal Projects

Jen Stark at Cooper Cole (formerly Show & Tell Gallery)

Masami Teraoka at Samuel Freeman Gallery

Nate Frizzell at LeBasse Projects

Larry Mullins at Blythe Projects

LeBasse Projects

Olek

Kris Lewis at David B. Smith Gallery

Feodor Voronov at Mark Moore Gallery

Greg Lamarche at Joshua Liner Gallery

Joshua Petker at LeBasse Projects

Mineo Mizuno for Samuel Freeman Gallery

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