Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Ripo’s Don’t Get Me Wrong

While most of us take language for granted as a method oftransmitting meaning, Ripo doesn’t let his audience get too comfortable withthe idea. In his aptly titled solo show at Barcelona’s Galeria Cosmo, “Don’tGet Me Wrong,” the artist subtly interlaces his vibrant mixed-media works witha variety of letters and symbols, putting the communicative power of words intoquestion. A New York native based in Barcelona, Ripo boasts a wide range oftext-based graffiti on the streets of Spain as well as in Albania, Brazil andChile—to name just a few of the numerous countries he has visited to paint.

Nastia Voynovskaya of Hi Fructose surveys his works below.

“Más o menos cuando menos es más” – Guatemala City, Guatemala

While most of us take language for granted as a method oftransmitting meaning, Ripo doesn’t let his audience get too comfortable withthe idea. In his aptly titled solo show at Barcelona’s Galeria Cosmo, “Don’tGet Me Wrong,” the artist subtly interlaces his vibrant mixed-media works witha variety of letters and symbols, putting the communicative power of words intoquestion. A New York native based in Barcelona, Ripo boasts a wide range oftext-based graffiti on the streets of Spain as well as in Albania, Brazil andChile—to name just a few of the numerous countries he has visited to paint.

“Muito Vivo (Really Alive)” – Sao Paulo, Brazil

Ripo’s latest exhibition combines controversial newsheadlines and vulgar expressions with an ornamental calligraphy style on paper,wood panel and canvas. The curvaceous abstract designs and hasty strokes of carmine and deep blue lend Ripo’s paintings a sense of motion, throttlinghis words away from their dictionary definitions and into the realm ofaesthetic objects. The artist works on surfaces that evoke the urbanenvironment of graffiti, like the crumbling brick wall he built in the centerof Galeria Cosmo. Many of Ripo’s artworks include mirrors and ambiguous phrases, leaving room to reflect each viewer’s interpretation. Nastia Voynovskaya of Hi Fructose surveys his works below.

Meta
Topics
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Illustrator-turned-fine artist Janice Sung’s figures seem at home amidst natural settings, whether in a lily pad pond or a garden, floating like a near-translucent milk specters. Her recent gallery showing at Gallery Nucleus in Los Angeles, the first using physical media by the artist. We asked the artist a few questions about her new body of work and about transitioning from digital to physical media. Click the above already and read the hifructose.com exclusive interview.
Hi-Fructose writer Zara Kand visits Coleccion SOLO in Spain for their latest Handle With Care exhibition. Click above to see the full report.
As a tribute to this “most wonderful time of the year” artists Lauren YS and Makoto Chi have created twenty-eight works (and a mural) for their new “Five Poisons” exhibition. We’ve interviewed the artists about the work. Click image above to read it, or else.
With a mix of dark humor and an impressive skill at creating inviting, yet dangerous worlds, the artist known as Bub has caught our eye. Click above to read our new interview with the artist and his new body of work, before it's too late.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List