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Aaron Horkey’s “Midwestern Heart” Show

In the tiny town of Windom, Minnesota, poster artist Aaron Horkey unveiled an exhibit containing 84 pieces of artwork he's created from 2004-2010, including a brand new limited-edition print. About 275 people packed a small room at the Remick Gallery, some traveling great distances, including a few who flew in from Japan. Beside many of the finished color poster prints, about 33 original drawings hung, allowing viewers to see Horkey's work before any colors, lettering, or other modifications were made. Have a look at some photos after the jump!

In the tiny town of Windom, Minnesota, poster artist Aaron Horkey unveiled an exhibit containing 84 pieces of artwork he’s created from 2004-2010, including a brand new print pictured here. About 275 people packed a small room at the Remick Gallery, some traveling great distances, including a few who flew in from Japan. Beside many of the finished color poster prints, about 33 original drawings hung, allowing viewers to see Horkey’s work before any colors, lettering, or other modifications were made.

The dark version of Horkey’s new print, each individually covered in colored-pencil details

The limited edition print was available in two versions – a lighter-hued set of 100 that sold for $80 each, and a darker version, limited to six, which sold for $800 each. The dark version included tons of additional object details added by Horkey with colored pencil, which he noted took him about eight hours per poster. Visitors were invited to take a guess at the number of stars in the print’s vast sky, and whoever guessed closest without going over the actual number was promised one of the six dark prints for free.

Detail on the dark version of the new print

Contrary to rumors, the show will not be Horkey’s final display (there’s more to come next year), but it is likely to be the last chance to see some of his original work in the midwest. Horkey’s work is amazingly detailed, and the chance to see his work up close revealed gobs of additional details that you simply can’t pick out in low-res images online. We hope to have an expanded report up later, but enjoy these photos from the show for now.. Until then, check out the Shrieking Tree blog for some more hi-res images in the days to come!

Detail on the light version of the new print

One of Horkey’s most color-intensive works: a 21-color screenprint entitled “Nesting”

The crowd has a look at some of Horkey's original artwork

The crowd compares original drawings to finished posters

Aye Jay

Fellow artist Aye Jay was in attendance, helping Aaron sell merchandise and balancing various objects on his noble head

Pictures and words courtesy of HF correspondent Justin Norman. For high resolution versions of photos from this show please visit the Shrieking Tree Blog.

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