by Andy SmithPosted on

This month, Rob Sato returns to Giant Robot with a new body of work under the title “Arco Iris.” These watercolor works tackle the differing significance of rainbows through several lenses. (Sato’s work is part of the upcoming Hi-Fructose Collected 4 box set, here.) The gallery and company says that this new show “marks another radical shift in style for the artist.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Michelle Avery Konczyk’s painted scenes use elements from the human body and the natural world, with absorbing and unsettling results. The works are often rendered in watercolor on paper mounted to panel for both a delicate, moody sensibility. The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Hi-Fructose co-founder Annie Owens assembles a new body of work in “A Place Worth Knowing,” a new show at La Luz De Jesus Gallery in Los Angeles. The title of this collection of watercolor works comes from Algernon Blackwood, a favorite author of the artist: “No place worth knowing yields itself at sight, and those the least inviting on first view may leave the most haunting pictures upon the walls of memory.” In her statement, Owens offers some insight on the figures found across her pieces. The show kicks off Aug. 4 and runs through Aug. 28.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Gosha Levochkin’s fanciful, strange worlds, often rendered in watercolor and gouache, carry an undercurrent of autobiography for the artist. The artist says “these mediums gives me the freedom to work with mistakes. I love the transparent feel that watercolor gives me and I love the opacity that gouache provides, over all making my work look like animation.” He was last featured on HiFructose.com as a solo artist here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The context of the narratives depicted in Tom Herzberg’s paintings isn’t always clear for the viewer. Yet, the humorous and occasionally unsettling watercolor and acrylic works are absorbing and offer the chance to form our own theories about each’s wild characters. Herzberg is a Chicago-based artist and educator whose illustrations for magazines, books, newspapers, and other products number in the thousands.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Esther Sarto, a 24-year-old painter based in Copenhagen, creates gouache and watercolor works that are often as unsettling as they are elegant. Sarto, once known as “Miss Take” as a street artist, often uses bare, entangled humans and plant-life to express her sentiments. ”I am not a very verbal person,” she told WEAART. “There are a lot of issues you can express better without words. Often the meaning lays between the lines.”