by Andy SmithPosted on


Stacey Rozich‘s new watercolor paintings are part of a body of work titled “Constellation Applebee’s,” and though it’s packed with folkloric and otherworldly sights, there’s an even more personal edge to her new work. The paintings are collected in the new show named for the series at Showboat Gallery in Los Angeles. She was last featured on the site here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Michelle Avery Konczyk’s riveting watercolor paintings offer surreal, intimate portraits. With the artist’s custom framing for each work, each work functions as a gateway to the artist’s explorations. The artist’s new show, “Les Fleurs” at Arch Enemy Arts, offers her most recent work and runs through June 28. The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Brazil native Alvaro Naddeo crafts intricate watercolor paintings that examine the consumption of the Western world through enormous, unlikely constructions. The artist, who has a background in advertising, has a particular knack for depicting discarded branded products. For some, his attention to detail and urban iconography likely recalls the work of Kevin Cyr, whose oil paintings have focused on graffiti-adorned vehicles.

by Andy SmithPosted on

This month, Rob Sato returns to Giant Robot with a new body of work under the title “Arco Iris.” These watercolor works tackle the differing significance of rainbows through several lenses. (Sato’s work is part of the upcoming Hi-Fructose Collected 4 box set, here.) The gallery and company says that this new show “marks another radical shift in style for the artist.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Michelle Avery Konczyk’s painted scenes use elements from the human body and the natural world, with absorbing and unsettling results. The works are often rendered in watercolor on paper mounted to panel for both a delicate, moody sensibility. The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Hi-Fructose co-founder Annie Owens assembles a new body of work in “A Place Worth Knowing,” a new show at La Luz De Jesus Gallery in Los Angeles. The title of this collection of watercolor works comes from Algernon Blackwood, a favorite author of the artist: “No place worth knowing yields itself at sight, and those the least inviting on first view may leave the most haunting pictures upon the walls of memory.” In her statement, Owens offers some insight on the figures found across her pieces. The show kicks off Aug. 4 and runs through Aug. 28.