by CaroPosted on

When we first heard from Spanish artist David de la Mano, he was just wrapping up a mural at Djerbahood Street Art festival, one of the world’s largest. Since then, he’s been to Madrid, Cardiff, and Wales- home to his latest mural with Sheffield based muralist and artist Phlegm. He has also painted murals in Montevideo (Uruguay), Sadnes and Stavanger (Norway), Buenos Aires (Argentina), Lima (Peru) and Florida, just to name a few. De la Mano doesn’t consider himself a “street artist”- he’s first and foremost an illustrator with work in the street. In his own words, he’s an “explorer of human behavior”, represented in masses of people, their conflicts, and visual contradictions.

by CaroPosted on

On Friday, September 12th, Soze Gallery will host double solo exhibitions by Los Angeles based Devin Liston and Gosha Levochkin (of DevNGosha, covered here). Titled “GROWN UPS” and “LOST” respectively, the event celebrates their first time exhibiting together since 2012- and highlights their unique dialogue as collaborators. Together, the two artists create a subtle dichotomy by focusing on two parts of a combined expression. We take a look after the jump.

by CaroPosted on

Urban Spree Gallery in Berlin is now making preparations for their huge street art show opening September 18th, “DUBL TRUBL”. Curated by artist Dscreet, the exhibition will boast 80 names you might be familiar with- Miss Van & Ciro, Ghostpatrol & Merda, Lush & Dscreet, Tizer & Ebot, Anthony Lister, Dabs and Myla, Pure Evil, and many more. The project is aptly named in anticipation of ‘doubling up’ artists who will be collaborating in addition to showing new work. We previously reviewed Miss Van and Ciro’s collaborative work last September, making this an anniversary of sorts. The artists in this show are paired because of their clashing styles, rather than similarities, celebrating the spontaneity and improvisation that comes with collaboration. It’s always fun when artists who don’t normally work together join efforts.

by CaroPosted on

Bigger is better, unless you’re Slinkachu. The UK-based artist (previously posted on our Tumblr here) started placing his tiny figures around London back in 2006. Slinkachu sources these from a company that supplies model train products, and vintage 1960s toys, which he embellishes for his own purposes. He’s a big fan of artist Chris Ware, whose works also tend to use a vivid color palette and are full of meticulous detail. When we say tiny, we mean barely a centimeter high. Slinkachu has to use a magnifying glass to add details to his little people. If it wasn’t for his compelling photo series, they would be left completely undiscovered to passersby. He has photographed these humorous, miniature scenes all over the world in places like Cape Town, Doha, Berlin, and New York, to name a few. During the course of documenting his work, Slinkachu began to question: Just what happens to art that’s been abandoned on the street?

by CaroPosted on

Ben Frost’s new exhibition “Know Your Product”, which opened Saturday at
Soze Gallery, might have also been titled “Know Your-self”. His new work is a deceivingly simple take on pop culture and what connects us. Through popular cartoons like Hello Kitty and Bugs Bunny painted on packaging, particularly pharmaceuticals, Frost is making an observation about our common “additions”. There’s also the possibility that Frost is poking fun at the things his viewer relates to. Prescription drugs are, after pot and alcohol, the most commonly abused substances by Americans 14 and older. So, it’s not surprising that they struck a chord with Frost. Read more after the jump.

by CaroPosted on

German urban artist Katharina Grosse doesn’t limit her vibrant artworks to a wall- she colors the world around her. Color is absolutely essential to her graffiti that covers buildings, mounds of dirt, and installations that evoke natural wonders like the Northern Lights. Her strokes don’t follow the contours of the chosen environment. They follow that of her own hand as she moves through the space, telling an abstract, emotional narrative. If it looks as though she hovered over the Earth with a spray gun, you would be right. Grosse’s process often involves dangerously leaning over scaffolding or being suspended from a crane. Throughout her career, her materials have varied from the conventional to unconventional; acrylic on canvas paintings and gallery walls to plastic and styrofoam alien-like formations. See more of her work after the jump.