by CaroPosted on

The Centro de Arte Contemporáneo de Málaga (aka CAC Málaga) has increasingly included urban art in its program, starting with projects in the streets. In 2014, the museum invited D*Face and Shepard Fairey to paint two massive side by side murals. The pair returned to CAC Málaga on June 26th to present two adjoining exhibitions. Notably, D*Face’s “Wasted Youth” marks his first major solo museum debut in Spain. Growing up, the British artist felt stifled by the curriculum set forth by his parents and schooling, which considered anything outside the norm to be a waste of his youth. 15 years into his career, the artist looks backs with this exhibition as if to proclaim the value of following your passions.

by CaroPosted on

Brooklyn based artist Ray Bartkus has toyed with the idea of reflections in his paintings, drawings and street art work, but not quite like this. When he was invited to paint a building along Šešupė River in Marijampole, Lithuania, the idea to paint it upside down was undeniable. “I never did anything with the reflection in the river before, but since the building was next to it, it was kind of an obvious thing to consider,” he says.

by CaroPosted on

In recent years, Mexico City has played host to some of the most progressive urban artists in the world. Many of them have come together in Celeya Brothers’ anniversary exhibition, “Cuatro Igual A Uno”: 3TTMan, Christiaan Conradie, Franco Fasoli aka JAZ, Fusca, Augustine Kofie, Lesuperdemon, Sten & Lex, Sanez, Smithe and Jorge Tellaeche. The group represents not only the freshman artists to show with the gallery, but also the city’s international draw, hailing from the United States, South Africa, to Argentina. Take a look at more photos from the exhibition after the jump.

by CaroPosted on

Faith, God, Science, Belief, Doubt… LA artist duo Cyrcle tests these every day philosophies in their glow-in-the-dark exhibition, “NOTHING EXISTS!”. The title points to their theme, Solipsism, a theory that asserts that nothing exists but an individual’s consciousness. It’s a grand concept tackled by concise forms, shapes and a largely monochromatic color palette. With hints of glowing green, their acrylic paintings on wood and relief sculptures feature deceivingly simplistic, spacey imagery. We recently got a behind the scenes look as they prepared for the exhibit, now on view at Station16 Gallery in Montreal.

by Sasha BogojevPosted on

On June 20th, Howard Griffin Gallery in Los Angeles introduced “Journey Galactiko,” a debut show by Broken Fingaz in the United States. For this show, the Isreali artists created a site-specific installation inside the gallery space, in form of a large 150 cubic meter temple. This type of monolith structure, which represents the show’s general theme, was inspired by several months of traveling and working across India, along with their vision of modern Western society. With this show, the artists pushed their limitations by constructing a large sculpture using only wood and found materials and presenting a new kind of work.

by CaroPosted on

Twoone, featured here, is a multidisciplinary Japanese artist currently living and working in Berlin perhaps most recognized for his animal portraits. His latest works, which he will debut in an open studio event, explore a range of new themes like psychology, anthropology, and the structure of nature, all inspired by his memories. We got to visit his studio ahead of the crowd last week, where we went behind the scenes of his process. At the moment, Twoone is experimenting with a new material – acrylic pieces that are displayed in a light box format. See more after the jump.