by Andy SmithPosted on

Photographer Davide Luciano‘s “Sheep Nation” series abandons the use of digital tricks and implements prosthetic make-up, meticulous lighting, and several models and crew members to create surreal scenes. Each of the mask applications took up to three hours to apply, and photos from the series move between stirring portraits and scenes from the everyday.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Matt Hansel’s painstakingly crafted oil and flashe paintings span periods of art history, remixing and interpreting in collage-like pieces. The blending of Renaissance and Lowbrow iconography is pushed further into surrealism with Hansel’s abstractions, which also defy the painter’s chosen tools, and his use of exposed linen. The artist, an MFA graduate of Yale, has been shown across the U.S. and in Tokyo, London, and beyond.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In a new show at Weinstein Gallery in San Francisco, Miss Van’s work is shown alongside an artist born 70 years before her, yet also exploring both surrealist and feminine sensibilities. A dialogue occurs between Van’s new work and that of Leonor Fini, who the spot says “was arguably the most ferociously and heroically independent woman artist of the 20th century.” Fini passed away in 1996.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Angela Gram’s oil paintings are alive with explorations of the natural world injected with distorted, vibrant sensibility. “The Past is Alive,” a show running at Gallery Poulsen in Denmark from Feb. 24 through the end of March, collects a new set of kinetic works. This new collection “The Past is Alive,” a show running at Gallery Poulsen in Denmark through “constant fascination with the monstrously surreal, expressed through her deconstructed animal kingdom.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Scott M. Greene’s surreal oil paintings explore several aspects of the Western experience: politics, pop culture, our relationship to the natural world, and the history of art itself. The artist says that the meaning of each work remains elusive for even him until some time has passed with the work, often not working with a complete idea and instead building one idea onto another.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In the La Merced neighborhood in San Cristóbal de las Casas in Chiapas, Mexico, costumed characters hit the streets to welcome the feast day of Our Lady of La Merced and reflect the sins of the wearer. In Diego Moreno’s photo series “Guardians of Memory,” he navigates this tradition in his old neighborhood and explores converging cultures by placing these monsters in domestic situations.