by Andy SmithPosted on

Oil painter Carrie Ann Baade says that her work “quotes from, interacts with, and deeply relates to art history.” Her absorbing, often haunting paintings often carry notes of Baroque or Renaissance art that are pulled into the artist’s own surrealist and autobiographical sensibility. The works can have a sense of controlled chaos to them, each element executed with elegance. She was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

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Heidi Taillefer fuses wild animals, machines, and elements of global mythologies in her surreal oil paintings. The mechanized aspects of these works reference the so-called progress of generations past. The artist herself cites her work as being influenced by “Max Ernst, Giorgio deChirico, and Paul Delvaux, and is an original creative fusion of classical figurative painting, surrealism, contemporary realism, and mythology combined with popular figurative traditions ranging from Victorian romanticism to science fiction.” The artist was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

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Jennybird Alcantara’s absorbing, vivid oil paintings blend the surreal and the fantastical. In a new show at KP Projects in Los Angeles, titled “Reveries of the Untamed Darlings,” the artist offers a new collection of works. Alcantara was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here. The gallery describes her work as “an epic fantasy, where the untamed are the gatekeepers of the mysterious beyond.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Holly Keogh’s oil paintings and collages simultaneously recreate and deconstruct the artist’s old family photographs and memories. Her “Synthetic Dreamers” series, in particular, implements distortion in a way that creates both intimacy and distance from the moments depicted in the work. The artist says that the concept of archiving—and the discernment involved—plays a vital role in her work.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Brooke DiDonato’s photographs put a strange touch on ordinary Western backdrops. The narratives, though vague, evoke intimacy in how it confronts its disappearing or despondent characters. In series like “Recess,” “In Bloom,” “Roses” and “A House is Not a Home,” the artist is able to either inject fleeting beauty into undesirable places or extract surrealism out of the unassuming.

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Ben Sanders crafts acrylic and oil paintings on panel with a texture and sensibility that exist far outside of convention. His new show at Ochi Projects in Los Angeles, titled “I Come to the Garden Alone” collects works created over the past two years. Giving life to everyday objects, the artist is able to construct narratives that both autobiographical and universal.