by Andy SmithPosted on

In a new show at Superchief Gallery in Los Angeles, painter Bunnie Reiss offers a new body of work under the title “Space Angels.” This collection of acrylic paintings, sculptures, and collages continue the evolution of the artist’s ethereal, vibrant sensibility. Her new sculptures, dubbed “imaginal selves,” are “created as we retreat from the chaos so we can cocoon and dissolve our current circumstances, then come out completely new, all the way down to our gooey cellular form,” a statement says. She was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Kikyz1313 blends graphite, watercolors, and pastels to create absorbing, yet unsettling pieces like “Effigy of Coiled Tragedies.” The points of entry to pieces by the Mexico-born artist may be gorgeous rendering and colors, yet it’s when the eye settles that it finds bleaker components. The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Just in time for Halloween, the new oil paintings of Beau White are as unsettling as they are absorbing. For this set, the Melbourne-based artist adds new layers to his work by integrating food and sweets alongside his gruesome faces. In a new group show at BeinArt Gallery in Australia, titled “Memento Mori, Memento Amare,” his latest work is collected. Isbael Peppard and Jonathan Guthmann also have pieces in the show.

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This month, Rob Sato returns to Giant Robot with a new body of work under the title “Arco Iris.” These watercolor works tackle the differing significance of rainbows through several lenses. (Sato’s work is part of the upcoming Hi-Fructose Collected 4 box set, here.) The gallery and company says that this new show “marks another radical shift in style for the artist.”

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Paul Cristina’s arresting works use charcoal, acrylics, and oils on paper mounted on the canvas. The Cleveland-born, self-taught artists evolved his style from the study of books, music, films, photographs, and people he’s encountered. The artist is currently based in Charleston, S.C.

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Andrea Kowch‘s stirring acrylic paintings combine both earnest reflections on the Western experience and surrealism. Her latest works, primarily focused on female subjects, place that discontent against rustic backdrops. Mixing in elements of nature, she’s able to make unexpected connections.