by Andy SmithPosted on

Alexander Churchill’s riveting paintings are brimming with color, each strange scene accented by pouring hues. In “Absurdist Futility” series, in particular, offers an absorbing collection of narratives and uncomfortably close portraits.

by Andy SmithPosted on


In Stuart Holland‘s charcoal drawings, reality is questioned through massive architecture and solitary figures. There’s both a cerebral and magical quality to these scenes, vague in its ties to actual reality. The gray values in his drawings, whether rendering abstract or geometric forms, add to their psychological nature.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Miles Johnston‘s surreal drawings bring elegance and distortion to our natural forms. The artist is contributing to the upcoming “Hi-Fructose Presents: The Art of The Mushroom” group show at the Compound Gallery in October, and in this post, takes us through the process of creating his work in the show. (He was also featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 45)

by Andy SmithPosted on

Julie Heffernan’s oil paintings imagine habitats and situations formed in response to environmental collapse. “When the Water Rises: Recent Paintings by Julie Heffernan,” a new exhibition coming to the Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art, offers these recent pieces. It runs Sept. 22 through Dec. 30 at the venue.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Tof Vanmarque continues to evolve the shifting perspectives and details of his elaborate acrylic paintings. One of the hallmarks of Vanmarque’s style is blending lush hues with makeshift bodies and eroding structures, each scene its own strange narrative. The artist was last featured on our website here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Mikiko Kumazawa’s hand brings both richness and chaos touch to contemporary life. Whether in pencil drawings or visceral sculptures, the Tokyo-based artist depicts worlds that are just connected enough to our realities to inspire anxiety. Kumazawa was last featured on HiFructose.com here.