by Andy SmithPosted on

Dan Lydersen’s vibrant, yet disconcerting explorations take a look at the Western experience through the lens of childhood. His oil paintings often specifically look at suburbia, whether through a dystopic landscape packed with its icons or through a contemporary filter. Lydersen was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Oil painter Joel Rea crafts surreal, modern narratives that create confrontations between man and nature. The artist, living and working in Australia, designs allegories that speak to the fragility and power of either side.He most recently had an exhibition at Mitchell Fine Art in Brisbane titled “Outsider.” Rea last appeared on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Jamian Juliano-Villani’s surreal, unsettling narratives are rendered in acrylics, implementing both brush and airbrush techniques. Found in these scenes are icons of popular culture and Western living, presented in ways that invoke examination, chuckles, and every so often, a bit of recoiling.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Ukrainian artist Aec Interesni Kazki, combining influences of “science, religion, mythology, cosmology, myths and times past,” comes to San Francisco for a new show at Mirus Gallery. The paintings in “The Earth Is Flat” are packed with surreal scenes and otherworldly surprises. The show kicks off Jan. 19 and runs through Feb. 10.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Artist Sean Landers blends varying styles in his paintings, using both surrealism and references to art history to toy with the viewers’ expectations. The artist uses sculpture, photography, drawing, and other approaches to accomplish this, yet in his paintings, he takes a particularly surreal approach to reveal “the process of artistic creation through humor and confession, gravity and pathos.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Japanese artist Koichi Enomoto packs his oil paintings with manga influences, dystopian visions, and pop culture nods. Often, these pieces offer a dialogue about mankind’s relationship with technology, in particular. The artist calls his work “my private myth, like a vision, rising from the relations between my own and public reality.”