by Andy SmithPosted on

In the 2005 series “Teenage Stories,” Julia Fullerton-Batten expressed the transition from girlhood to womanhood with surrealist photographs of towering adolescents. These aren’t Photoshopped images, as Fullerton-Batten noted in the artist statement: “I shot the images on location in model villages so that the girls appear to have outgrown the world they live in, as in their day-dream existence.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

It’s easy to get lost in the arresting vision of Mike Worrall, who was last mentioned on Hi-Fructose in this 2014 piece. But maybe lost is the wrong word, as there is a definitive space viewers inhabit as they look upon works like “The Lost Narrative,” above, which takes us to the “World’s End.” The paintings’ subjects often gaze back at the viewer, further shackling passers-by into lingering.

by Andy SmithPosted on

At first glance, Gregory Crewdson’s photographs are stills from eerie films with small American towns as backdrops. But these movies don’t actually exist. These tableaux, as Lynchian or Hitchcockian as they may seem, are single-frame narratives. Sometimes, the story is one of loneliness, even as multiple people share a room. Other times, there’s something more overly haunting and surreal at work, a moment of sustained horror that exists just after the climax of an arc.

by CaroPosted on

The word “mythological” is often used to describe the work of Mexican artist Curiot (real name Favio Martinez). Featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 29, Curiot doesn’t apply a specific myth to the images that he paints, strongly inspired by his Mexican heritage which he hopes to uphold in his art. “The mythological creatures represent the forces of nature, the energy that flows in the universe and their relationship with the world- I like to believe they come from the spirit realm,” he told us.

by CaroPosted on

Scott G. Brooks, featured here on our blog, paints offbeat portraits, often expressing a surreal narrative inspired by children’s books and his own psyche. Described as twisted, sentimental, and disturbing, his portraits are characterized by his use of wit and the distorted version of reality they present. “Using a language that is easily understood, I tell stories. I weave figures, symbols, and elements together to create a narrative to share with an audience,” he says.

by CaroPosted on

Earlier today, we brought you photos from Saturday night’s opening of Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose, a bi-coastal collaboration between the magazine and Virginia MOCA. Now, we’d like to give you a closer look at the art and see what it’s like to walk through the halls of this unprecedented group of 51 new contemporary artists from all genres and corners of the world.