by CaroPosted on

Jenny Morgan’s (HF Vol. 21) latest series is set to debut on May 14th at Driscoll Babcock. “All We Have Is Now” features themes of life, death, and rebirth, represented in paintings of her vibrantly colored figures. It is a continuation of her ongoing concept, centered around the cycle of life and spirituality. Here, this is combined with the morose of death, as in her painting “Skeleton Woman” where a nude mingles with a skeleton. The image could almost be read like a ying-yang, where the weightless pose of the girl is juxtaposed with the heaviness of the skeleton, yet it does not crush her. Overall, Morgan’s art is like a balancing act between polar opposites of both theme and style choices.

by CaroPosted on

Chicago based Jennifer Presant merges familiar, everyday places into mysterious landscapes. Her subjects vary from displaced household items and exposed figures in non-sensical, dramatically lit spaces. Looking at her work, we find ourselves staring into overwhemingly quiet scenes, such as an empty bedroom in the wilderness or middle of the ocean. Presant calls this mixture of environments a “visual metaphor” which symbolizes our ongoing experiences of time, memory, and relationship with physical space.

by CaroPosted on

Seattle based artist Kari-Lise Alexander’s beauties have a norse-like quality true to her Scandinavian roots. They get lost in daydreams in her show “Inflorescence”, opening Valentine’s Day at Distinction gallery in Escondidio, CA. The title refers to the clusters of flowers they wear, drawn in a style inspired by the Norwegian folk art of rosemaling. Like these complicated twists of branches, her girls seek out and embrace eachother for comfort, melancholy in spite of their prettiness.

by CaroPosted on

Some of you may be familiar with the creepy-cute paintings of Miso- she spent the majority of last year exhibiting under her real name, Karen Hsiao (featured here). To accomodate her variety of styles, Hsiao created her “Miso” namesake, under which she exhibits surrealistic works inspired by biology and the unkown. Her upcoming solo show at La Luz de Jesus, “Cornucopia”, reduces her already tiny paintings to an even smaller scale.

by CaroPosted on

The colorful works of Hawaii native Ekundayo (HF Vol. 9) combine surrealism with influences from his graffiti days. His paintings sometimes lean on the nightmarish, as in his portrayal of anthropomorphic subjects in haunting scenes. On Saturday, he will debut a new series with “Collective Reflections” at Thinkspace gallery in Los Angeles. Ekundayo describes his solo as a “gift to that feeling I know we all connect to when reaching deep within ourselves.” Check out our preview after the jump!

by CaroPosted on

On Saturday night, Los Angeles pop-up space 80Forty transformed into Lola’s “The Younger”. Her exhibition, 2-years in the making, tells the personal story of Lola’s creative upbringing in an environment full of personal touches. The space included her own fireplace mantel, as seen in our studio visit, with decorative furniture and 3d pieces on display. As the title suggests, we follow the ‘younger’ Lola into adulthood through a series of playful symbolism. In her youth, Lola spent time drawing with her father, also an artist, and playing with the toys inherited from her grandparents. These experiences find their way into her paintings, featuring Alice in Wonderland-like little girls in whimsical situations.