by Andy SmithPosted on

Jean-Michel Bihorel, a Paris-based digital artist, crafts bewildering illustrations of otherworldly figures and scenes. These creatures can have a natural make-up, like floral collections or delicate landscapes, or they seem entirely alien. Bihoral works as a CG supervisor for Mécanique Générale and is a co-founder and mentor of CreativeSeeds, a training school for aspiring animators.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Sam Octigan, an Australian artist, mixes the figurative and the abstract in his paintings. His subjects sometimes are enveloped in these abstractions and disparate objects. Otherwise, they comprise these figures, like memories or something more haunting. Even when the artist limits his palette to varying shades of gray, his works absorb and convey kineticism.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Min Liu, a Taiwan-born, Brooklyn-based animator/graphic designer, has posted dozens of red-hued animated GIFs in her Bloody Diary online. The ongoing project features hilarious animations, often full of cats (and several other beings) in surreal situations. The artist keeps her palette simple in this series, with reds, blacks, and negative space used for each creation.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Michael Dandley, an artist based in New Hampshire, crafts vibrant, transformative works out of the ordinary. At times, the artist is commenting on our impact on the natural world; elsewhere, he captures the engrossing beauty out of our sight. Though not all carry the surreal weight of his wilder images, all contain a certain serenity in the artist’s choices of palette and perspective.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In a new show at Corey Helford Gallery in Los Angeles, Natalia Fabia explores life cycles, from our stardust origins to death, and the natural portals that lead us to the divine. “Rainbeau Samsara,” which runs through Dec. 10 at the space, blends the conventions of oil painting and pops of sparkles and glitter to reflect the transcendental nature of the work’s content.

by Andy SmithPosted on

At first glance, the work of Canadian artist Brandon Constans may appear to be collage. Instead, the Ontario-based artist paints each of the objects and creatures used to build single figures. Several of the artist’s paintings are created using a process he describes as “a technique of overlapping acrylic paint and Matte Medium in various ways to create a two-dimensional embossed surface.”