by Andy SmithPosted on

Themes of science and introspection permeate throughout the oil paintings created by Romanian artist Victor Fota. His current body of work, “Human Extension,” progresses those ideas by exploring relationships between man and machine. The result is a surreal experience entangled in reality and science fiction.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Shang Chengxiang, born in Shenyang, China, creates bold paintings in which pops of brilliant colors are mixed with surreal imagery. There’s a sense of wonder in the artist’s works, often privately observed or existing outside of human interaction altogether. The artist is part of the group show “FIREFLOWERS” at Art Labor Gallery in Shanghai, running July 2-Aug. 16.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The dream worlds depicted in Alison Stinely’s sculptural paintings extend off the panel and into the psyche of the viewer. And from process to execution, the artist’s work hinges on blurred realities.

by Margot BuermannPosted on

Rom Villaseran is a contemporary visual artist from the Philippines whose renderings of the natural world dwell in the realms of dreams and fantasy. His work has been described as neo-surrealist and hallucinogenic, combining the aesthetics of surrealism and science fiction to reveal the inner workings of the artist’s vivid imagination.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In the 2005 series “Teenage Stories,” Julia Fullerton-Batten expressed the transition from girlhood to womanhood with surrealist photographs of towering adolescents. These aren’t Photoshopped images, as Fullerton-Batten noted in the artist statement: “I shot the images on location in model villages so that the girls appear to have outgrown the world they live in, as in their day-dream existence.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

It’s easy to get lost in the arresting vision of Mike Worrall, who was last mentioned on Hi-Fructose in this 2014 piece. But maybe lost is the wrong word, as there is a definitive space viewers inhabit as they look upon works like “The Lost Narrative,” above, which takes us to the “World’s End.” The paintings’ subjects often gaze back at the viewer, further shackling passers-by into lingering.