by CaroPosted on

Italian artist Agostino Arrivabene paints an iconographic universe that exists somewhere at the division between the real world from the spiritual realm. Previously featured here on our blog, his works include landscapes, portraits, and large paintings allegorical and apocalyptic in nature. Subjects of his paintings often appear as if from another time and place, celestial bodies and nudes emerging from the earth that recall the figures of those who influence him, particularly Gustave Moreau and Odd Nerdrum. Arrivabene describes his personal world as one that is eclectic and occult, where his artistic lanuage changes depending on his life experience. His upcoming solo exhibition at Cara Gallery in New York, “Hierogamy”, delves into mythological themes and ideas about personal intimacy, change, and time.

by CaroPosted on

Pennsylvania based artist Dorian Vallejo paints the realm of our subconscious as a dreamworld of floating figures, forests and natural motifs. Though his subject matter and style has evolved and shifted between Hyperealism and Surrealism, one element remains the same and that is his interest in feminine beauty, and the beauty of life as a whole. “Most of my work centers around an interest in psychology, philosophy and how we process ideas,” the artist explained in an email to Hi-Fructose. “I’m also interested in pop culture, the modern existence, and what I see as the poetry of life. I alter my approach depending on how I’m engaging ideas.”

by CaroPosted on

Carlo Cane’s misty landscapes appear as if in a beautiful dream, but through the thick fog exists something sinister and unappealing. The Italian artist, featured here on our blog, is distraught about how we are treating our environment and the implications of our growing disconnection to nature. But rather than focus on images of loss, he expresses his concern by presenting us with bewildering and surreal portrayals of nature in its most vigorous and alluring state. Cane recently shared his new paintings in an email to Hi-Fructose, in which he explores the possibilities of our future, while taking a note from our past.

by CaroPosted on

Matching the look of flesh has always been and is still considered one of the most demanding tasks for any artist. It is notoriously difficult for many reasons, making it a subject of intrigue throughout history. Brooklyn based sculptor Russel Cameron is a self taught artist who has made recreating flesh the primary focus of his work. His ongoing series “Flesh and Bone” explores the subtleties between skin tones, wrinkled and smooth parts, soft and rough textures, using materials like clay, paint, wood, and metal. While he sees skin and its nuances as a thing of beauty, he presents it in unsettling ways.

by CaroPosted on

With the rise of technology, experiencing the natural world in modern society has become almost completely irrelevant. New Jersey based painter Angela Gram portrays this tension between nature and humanity in her paintings of dispersed animals. As animals become less relevant to our every day or apparent needs, we lose our connection to them entirely, to the point where they become like figments of our imaginations. She represents this idea by deconstructing the animal body. Tropical birds, black panthers, and river dolphins are just a few of the exotic species that she distorts as if their forms were disappearing into thin air.

by CaroPosted on

To the world, Salvador Dalí was an eccentric Surrealist and animation pioneer Walt Disney was a notorious dreamer. But to each other, they were fierce friends and collaborators. Although the unlikely pair grew up worlds apart, they found one another through their art, and their work together has endured long after their lifetime. The history of this remarkable friendship between two icons is explored in a new exhibition titled “Disney and Dalí: Architects of the Imagination” at The Walt Disney Family Museum in San Francisco.