by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on


Martin Wittfooth

An esoteric concept that fascinated the first Surrealists, an “égrégore” is a sort of mob mentality. Scholar Pierre Mabille defined it as “a group of humans endowed with a personality different from that of the individuals forming it.” This concept of collective consciousness was the springboard for Yves Laroche Gallery’s eponymous exhibition, the gallery’s largest group show to date. With dozens of artists, many of whom are associated with the Pop Surrealist movement, the show builds its momentum from the multitudes of distinct yet complementary aesthetics joined together. Among the line-up are names that will be well-known to our readers: Josh Agle (Shag), Martin Wittfooth, Amy Sol, Joe Sorren, Liz McGrath, Annie Owens (Hi-Fructose co-editor-in-chief), AJ Fosik, Miss Van and many others. Take a look at our sneak peek below before “Égrégore” opens on October 30 at Yves Laroche Gallery in Montreal.

by CaroPosted on

Robert S. Connett’s highly detailed and Natural Science-inspired illustrations have acquired a few labels, from strange, fantastical, alienesque, to unsettling. Even his website is “grotesque.com.” If evolution is an artist, then Connett’s artwork captures its unreal color palette and perspectives of worlds rarely explored. His studio in Los Angeles is filled to the brim with specimins, family photos and antiques that serve as reminders of his past and his inspiration. Rarely, if ever, does Connett invite visitors into this private space. In this exclusive interview, we discuss the thought process behind his new works.

by CaroPosted on

Closing today at Leontia Gallery in London, “FLESH” exhibits sensual, raw and dark new works by Magnus Gjoen, Flora Borsi, Maria Koshneneko, Mariska Karto. Their pieces examine the beautiful and fragile, haunting and disturbing aspects of the figure, reinterpreted in a variety of media. Each sheds new light on this classical idea, by embracing it with contemporary and pop styles mixed with the influences of fine art.

by Nathan SpoorPosted on

Kyle Thompson is a young photographer on the rise. He began shooting at age 19 in his hometown of Chicago, Illinois, and in the last couple years has amassed a substantial body of work that shows a surprisingly adept and concise voice for such a young artist. This work, just released in a book titled Somewhere Else is comprised mostly of self-portraits taken in various abandoned locations found while on a road trip traveling the country.

by CaroPosted on

The dark and insanely detailed drawings of Laurie Lipton mix elements from different eras of art and time, including her own surreal version of reality.  When asked her to describe her meticulous, cross-hatching in one word,  she answered, “sick” (with a grin).  She has exhibited and lived all over the world from Holland, Germany, France, and recently London, where she spent time with the likes of Terry Gilliam, one of her favorite creatives. She will exhibit the art discussed here at Ace Gallery in Los Angeles next year.

by CaroPosted on

Since January, Texas based artist Jason Limon has been hard at work on a new character driven narrative, “Monstrous Days”. When we last caught up with him, it was before his 2013 solo “Foretell”, focused on strange, hybrid characters in nightmarish imagery. His work always has a cinematic quality like an apocalyptic 1950s monster film that was never made. Classic movie monsters are traditionally an antagonistic force to be reckoned with who demand empathy from the viewer. Limon mixes these references with the inspiration he finds in equally perplexing nature. Take a look after the jump.